How to Invest in Bitcoin Technology - Imagup

Ethereum Classic

Ethereum Classic is an open, decentralized, and permissionless public blockchain, that aims to fulfill the original promise of Ethereum, as a platform where smart contracts are free from third-party interference. ETC prioritizes trust-minimization, network security, and integrity. All network upgrades are non-contentious with the aim to fix critical issues or to add value with newly proposed features; never to create new tokens, or to bail out flawed smart contracts and their interest groups.
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This could save Planet Earth!

My grandpa once told me: "Listen dipsh*t, if you rely on someone else for your food... then they own you AND your lovely wife."
Well... my crazy grandpa wasn't totally wrong. There is simply too many people on this planet and not enough resources to go around. All the family's generational wealth has been either divided into dust or soaked up by the rich 1%. The division of wealth and power in this world is so unbalanced, it's sick and saddening. Because of this, there are many people struggling who are so tormented and defeated... homeless, unemployed, or working as wage slaves (because overpopulation makes for cheap labor); that they feel like there is no place for them in the future and that suicide is the only option. In our current world, the right to eat, shelter, and drink fresh water are not guaranteed rights to ALL individuals! That fact is absolutely just mind blowing. Who's to blame? Humanity's greed, overpopulation, and poor distribution of efforts and resources, perhaps. (Rant over)
THE ETHICAL SOLUTION of a RADICAL NEW WORLD: In my opinion, The Great Pyramids of Egypt are a simple reminder of Maslow's 6-tier hierarchy of needs. When you take Maslow's pyramid and combined it with a hybrid of Homesteading and Universal Basic Income, something heavenly is born! Regardless of birth race, place, or poverty...I believe all people of earth and all governances should adjoin to fulfill the common goal that each living person has the right to have their Physiological needs met. We NEED to get people gardening and reconnected with their roots! (If we don't, people's nutritionless crappy diets will continue resulting in cancer and disease.) In my opinion, it's what we ALL NEED. I call it Maslow's Ark.
Maslow's Ark - Life on Earth should be modeled after Heaven; with a place and purpose prepared for you when you're born. When born to the Earth, you deserve the right to your basic physiological needs such as food, water, and shelter. (Not to struggle because your dirt poor parents selfishly birthed you to 'duck-tape' their failed marriage together... or because they get a child tax credit! \sarcasm**) We, The United People of Earth in order to transcend Maslow's Physiological needs as a birthright. Achieved by way of hybrid mix of self-sufficient homesteading and Universal Basic Income (UBI) payments. To transform and upgrade shitty land and broken homes into self-sufficient sustainable functional quality 2 or 4 Acre personalized ('green new deal'/ permaculture) homesteads and housing, thereby creating an economy of guaranteed paid jobs with the support of resources from local and world governances centrally focused on preparing places (aka Heavens on earth) for others and future generations. When working for Maslow's Ark, you are essentially doing the work of an Angel. (Biblically speaking, Naoh's Ark was a literal ship, but what is Planet Earth, but one giant Space Ship?) This way of life is my little brain-child and I would like to name it "Maslow's Ark."
We all have Physiological needs to live a fulfilled life. Nobody wants war. Nobody wants death or famine. I want to focus specifically on the 'end-cap' Tiers 1 & 6 of Maslow's pyramid as how they would look if applied to our current world. I think that all countries and individuals with a net wealth over $10m must contribute generously of resources by a majority vote (perhaps) via coordination of the United Nations leverage to kick-start this.
A quick refresher of Maslow's 6-tier pyramid:
Tier 1. Physiological needs - these are biological requirements for human survival, e.g. air, food, water, shelter, clothing, warmth, sex, sleep.
Tier 2. Safety needs - Once an individual’s physiological needs are satisfied, the needs for security and safety become salient. Protection from greed and corruption.
Tier 3. Love and belongingness needs - after physiological and safety needs have been fulfilled, the third level of human needs is social and involves feelings of belongingness. The need for interpersonal relationships motivates behavior
Tier 4. Esteem needs are the fourth level in Maslow’s hierarchy - which Maslow classified into two categories: (i) esteem for oneself (dignity, achievement, mastery, independence) and (ii) the desire for reputation or respect from others (e.g., status, prestige).
Tier 5. Self-actualization needs are the highest level in Maslow's hierarchy, and refer to the realization of a person's potential, self-fulfillment, seeking personal growth and peak experiences. Maslow (1943) describes this level as the desire to accomplish everything that one can, to become the most that one can be.
Tier 6. Transcendence - the very highest and most inclusive or holistic levels of human consciousness, behaving and relating, as ends rather than means, to oneself, to significant others, to human beings in general, to other species, to nature, and to the cosmos. AKA - To Help other's Self-Actualize, beginning with Physiological Needs.
**How it works, in a nut shell:**If you don't have kids, you're a hero and don't need to work much. If you have 1 child, you must work Part-Time for Maslow's Ark. If you have 2 children, you must work Full-Time for Maslow's Ark.
How it will work in detail (Beta v1.3):
No Children Pledge:
  1. At the age of 15, you graduate from a life skills school and may inherit the choice of either: Option A - Inherit a paid-for 2 acre prepared homestead and receive 70% ($840usd per month) UBI Payments. Option B - Assigned a non-arable rent-free apartment with 80% UBI payments ($960us per month). Option C - You live life freestyle, like in an RV, conversion van, or you're homeless, or a homestead/apartment isn't available or prepared for you yet; you shall receive 100% ($1200) UBI payments. *For either option A,B, or C; the child-free individual must perform volunteer work for Maslow's Ark 1 day per week (4 flexible days per month) for 20 years. *Your choice depends on if you preference for living in-town or out-of-town. (The individual may have the opportunity to switch between these, once every 4 years.) *In addition, those who pledge not to have children are awarded a 1oz 24k Gold world medal of honor for serving the duty of your planet for their selfless child-free commitment. AKA If you don't have kids, you don't need to work much. (Through population de-escalation, these people are the real heroes and saviors of planet Earth.) *A married child-free couple may choose to consolidate in one of three ways: A. Consolidate to upgrade into a single 4-acre prepared homestead and each receive 65% ($780usd) UBI payments. C. Consolidate to a single 2-acre prepared homestead and each receive 80% UBI payments ($960us per month). B. Consolidate to upgrade into a non-arable single family home and each receive 85% ($1020usd) UBI payments. D. Consolidate to a single apartment, but each receive 90% ($1,080us) UBI Payments. (It's these individuals that will have the most financial momentum to start a business, be teachers, or become BacheloMaster Degree Students if they choose to pursue higher education with their free time, or for those that love to travel and see the world, and generally be the local economy stimulators.)
  2. For married parents caring for 1 child, When that child turns 2 years of age: Option A - If the parents have consolidated to a single 4-acre prepared homestead, they will each receive a 40% UBI ($480). Option B - If the parents have consolidated to a single 2-acre prepared homestead, they will each receive a 50% UBI ($600). Option C - If the parents have consolidated to a non-arable single-family home they will each receive a 55% UBI ($660). Option D - If the parents have consolidated to a single apartment they will each receive 60% UBI ($720). \In either option A,B,C, or D; the married couple must also commit to paid work for Maslow's Ark a minimum net of 5 days per week for 20 years. The parents may divide the work days between each other as a 0/5 or 2/3 split for example.* **If the couple's net 20 years of work service concludes prior to retirement, then their UBI payment will be 65% each until retirement.
  3. For married parents caring for 2 children, When that child turns 2 years of age: Option A - If the parents have consolidated to a single 4-acre prepared homestead, they will each receive 25% UBI ($300). Option B - If the parents have consolidated to a single 2-acre prepared homestead, they will each receive 30% UBI ($360). Option C - If the parents have consolidated to a non-arable single-family home they will each receive 40% UBI ($480). Option D - If the parents have consolidated to a single apartment they will each receive 45% UBI ($540). \In either option A,B,C, or D; the married couple must also commit to paid work for Maslow's Ark a minimum net of 7 days per week for 20 years. The parents may divide the work days between each other as a 0/7, 2/5, or 3/4 split for example. (The 3/4 split allows someone to always be home for the kids, animals, and vegetable gardens.)* **If the couple's net 20 years of work service concludes prior to retirement, then their UBI payment will be 55% each until retirement.
  4. Adoption: If a married couple with no children elect to adopt an orphan child they are awarded a 1oz 24k Gold world medal of honor for serving the duty of their planet. In addition to each keeping their 100% UBI payments, they also qualify for an additional 30% UBI payment until that child turns 16 (when they will have Maslow's Physiological needs fulfilled as a birthright).
Experimental Extra Options:
  1. An optional 6 acre prepared homestead capped at 20% UBI Payments.
  2. An optional 10 acre prepared homestead capped at 10% UBI Payments.
Universal conditions: -Individuals cannot sell or sub-lease their single family homes, homesteads, or apartments for profit, since they were prepared by The People of Earth, they inherently belong to The People of Earth. -World adoption of a 2-child limit. -Universal Healthcare -Free Education for All -Retirement age is 65, when you receive 90% UBI (instead of Social Security).
How Maslow's Ark Schooling Would Work: Schools would serve the communities multi-functionally; as food banks, seed banks, internship & job connection centers, and teaching children basic life skills. At the heart of every town city and community, there must be an large agricultural center (not just a vampire w-mart), with all the tools and resources needed to grow fruits, vegetables, care for farm animals, and other things like making compost. I propose combining the agricultural center and school as one system. If hungry people in the community desperately need food or seeds, (since the kids are growing food) they can return to their school for food and cheap supplies, functioning as the backbone and heart of every town. All current schools will be converted into large-scale self sufficient homesteads. The governances of the world will fund the solar and wind-powered system upgrades (making them off-grid which give the students a means to learn these systems). Ages 4-10 would be your standard basic Math, Language, Health, Cooking, and History. In addition, 50% of each school day would be learning how to grow food, raise chickens, milk cows, and maintain all aspects of a homestead. (Children will actually care for 2 reasons: A. Everyone loves baby chickens and B. The kids are promised a homestead at 15, and that's SO MUCH BRIGHT & POSITIVE ENERGY! (Unless they choose the apartment...)) (Every human should know how to be self-sufficient!) It's much better for children to during fresh organic milk and vitamin-rich tomatoes anyways, in those early development years. Ages 11-13 would be training in a more specific life-skill trade. Ages 14-15 would be internships where students go to job-sites to learn and assist the parents in Maslow's Ark homestead preparation. Additionally, the schools may also function as a free wholesome dating and room-mate pairing service as well as free marriages. World Governances would fund schools to build homes, (rather than the traditional mortgage) further making schools central work hubs for internships and parents.
Maslow's jobs may include (and be educationally centered around): -Housing & Apartment Rehabilitation (Carpentry, Electrical, Plumbing, HVAC) -Boosting soil Fertility & Compost Creation -Regional Food Gardening, Nurseries, & Research -Planting Permaculture Trees, Arborist, Lumber Mills -Building Greenhouses & Barns -Wood & Gas eventually replaced by fusion energy electricity plants -Solar, Wind, and Battery Technology/Service -Helping care for thy Elderly & Disabled neighbors -Farm Animal Care & breeding -Property, Homes, and Jobs bank coordinator -Small scale Electric Farm Equipment & Electric vehicle production & service. -Clean Water Production such as wells, ponds, rainwater and desalination. -100% Trash Reuse, Repurpose, & Recycling -Teaching all the aforementioned.
The Economy: Self sufficiency means less tax revenue for the government, but at the same time, (the US government is doing a terrible job at creating jobs and unemployment rates are skyrocketing. Capitalist governments don't care if businesses like w-mart or h-depot bleed towns dry of money and killed all the mom n' pop shops, or let robots take over factories. Between the green new deal, and working for Maslow's Ark homesteads, there would be millions of jobs created for regular every-day people. Every house with a big lawn could be retrofit as a homestead. Parents of kids must work, therefore they get charged taxes on their paychecks. Parents without children have a greater allowance to spend money on taxable goods and services. With The People of Earth circumventing the need to spend the bulk of their lives paying for a mortgage and having money tied into their mortgages, you will see a huge shift in people investing in other assets such as stocks, silver, gold, and bitcoin as a means of generational wealth, as it should be. (Disclaimer* I'm not an economist.) I would love to hear feedback if you agree or disagree that this would work and suggest improvements to make it work better.
In conclusion, my number and % ratios may need some fine tuning, but I believe this is the only functioning groundwork for the way that a simple and fulfilled life should be. I would love to hear feedback and I hope this concept of hybrid homesteading & % Ratio UBI becomes widely known and built upon.
submitted by MindfulMowgli to antinatalism [link] [comments]

Meet Brock Pierce, the Presidential Candidate With Ties to Pedophiles Who Wants to End Human Trafficking

thedailybeast.com | Sep. 20, 2020.
The “Mighty Ducks” actor is running for president. He clears the air (sort of) to Tarpley Hitt about his ties to Jeffrey Epstein and more.
In the trailer for First Kid, the forgettable 1996 comedy about a Secret Service agent assigned to protect the president’s son, the title character, played by a teenage Brock Pierce, describes himself as “definitely the most powerful kid in the universe.” Now, the former child star is running to be the most powerful man in the world, as an Independent candidate for President of the United States.
Before First Kid, the Minnesota-born actor secured roles in a series of PG-rated comedies, playing a young Emilio Estevez in The Mighty Ducks, before graduating to smaller parts in movies like Problem Child 3: Junior in Love. When his screen time shrunk, Pierce retired from acting for a real executive role: co-founding the video production start-up Digital Entertainment Network (DEN) alongside businessman Marc Collins-Rector. At age 17, Pierce served as its vice president, taking in a base salary of $250,000.
DEN became “the poster child for dot-com excesses,” raising more than $60 million in seed investments and plotting a $75 million IPO. But it turned into a shorthand for something else when, in October of 1999, the three co-founders suddenly resigned. That month, a New Jersey man filed a lawsuit alleging Collins-Rector had molested him for three years beginning when he was 13 years old. The following summer, three teens filed a sexual-abuse lawsuit against Pierce, Collins-Rector, and their third co-founder, Chad Shackley. The plaintiffs later dropped their case against Pierce (he made a payment of $21,600 to one of their lawyers) and Shackley. But after a federal grand jury indicted Collins-Rector on criminal charges in 2000, the DEN founders left the country. When Interpol arrested them in 2002, they said they had confiscated “guns, machetes, and child pornography” from the trio’s beach villa in Spain.
While abroad, Pierce had pivoted to a new venture: Internet Gaming Entertainment, which sold virtual accessories in multiplayer online role-playing games to those desperate to pay, as one Wired reporter put it, “as much as $1,800 for an eight-piece suit of Skyshatter chain mail” rather than earn it in the games themselves. In 2005, a 25-year-old Pierce hired then-Goldman Sachs banker Steve Bannon—just before he would co-found Breitbart News. Two years later, after a World of Warcraft player sued the company for “diminishing” the fun of the game, Steve Bannon replaced Pierce as CEO.
Collins-Rector eventually pleaded guilty to eight charges of child enticement and registered as a sex offender. In the years that followed, Pierce waded into the gonzo economy of cryptocurrencies, where he overlapped more than once with Jeffrey Epstein, and counseled him on crypto. In that world, he founded Tether, a cryptocurrency that bills itself as a “stablecoin,” because its value is allegedly tied to the U.S. dollar, and the blockchain software company Block.one. Like his earlier businesses, Pierce’s crypto projects see-sawed between massive investments and curious deals. When Block.one announced a smart contract software called EOS.IO, the company raised $4 billion almost overnight, setting an all-time record before the product even launched. The Securities and Exchange Commission later fined the company $24 million for violating federal securities law. After John Oliver mocked the ordeal, calling Pierce a “sleepy, creepy cowboy,” Block.one fired him. Tether, meanwhile, is currently under investigation by the New York Attorney General for possible fraud.
On July 4, Pierce announced his candidacy for president. His campaign surrogates include a former Cambridge Analytica director and the singer Akon, who recently doubled down on developing an anonymously funded, $6 billion “Wakanda-like” metropolis in Senegal called Akon City. Pierce claims to be bipartisan, and from the 11 paragraphs on the “Policy” section of his website it can be hard to determine where he falls on the political spectrum. He supports legalizing marijuana and abolishing private prisons, but avoids the phrase “climate change.” He wants to end “human trafficking.” His proposal to end police brutality: body cams.
His political contributions tell a more one-sided story. Pierce’s sole Democratic contribution went to the short-lived congressional run of crypto candidate Brian Forde. The rest went to Republican campaigns like Marco Rubio, Rick Perry, John McCain, and the National Right to Life Political Action Committee. Last year alone, Pierce gave over $44,000 to the Republican National Committee and more than $55,000 to Trump’s re-election fund.
Pierce spoke to The Daily Beast from his tour bus and again over email. Those conversations have been combined and edited for clarity.
You’re announcing your presidential candidacy somewhat late, and historically, third-party candidates haven’t had the best luck with the executive office. If you don’t have a strong path to the White House, what do you want out of the race?
I announced on July 4, which I think is quite an auspicious date for an Independent candidate, hoping to bring independence to this country. There’s a lot of things that I can do. One is: I’m 39 years old. I turn 40 in November. So I’ve got time on my side. Whatever happens in this election cycle, I’m laying the groundwork for the future. The overall mission is to create a third major party—not another third party—a third major party in this country. I think that is what America needs most. George Washington in his closing address warned us about the threat of political parties. John Adams and the other founding fathers—their fear for our future was two political parties becoming dominant. And look at where we are. We were warned.
I believe, having studied systems, any time you have a system of two, what happens is those two things come together, like magnets. They come into collision, or they become polarized and become completely divided. I think we need to rise above partisan politics and find a path forward together. As Albert Einstein is quoted—I’m not sure the line came from him, but he’s quoted in many places—he said that the definition of insanity is making the same mistake or doing the same thing over and over and over again, expecting a different result. [Ed. note: Einstein never said this.] It feels like that’s what our election cycle is like. Half the country feels like they won, half the country feels like they lost, at least if they voted or participated.
Obviously, there’s another late-comer to the presidential race, and that’s Kanye West. He’s received a lot of flak for his candidacy, as he’s openly admitted to trying to siphon votes away from Joe Biden to ensure a Trump victory. Is that something you’re hoping to avoid or is that what you’re going for as well?
Oh no. This is a very serious campaign. Our campaign is very serious. You’ll notice I don’t say anything negative about either of the two major political candidates, because I think that’s one of the problems with our political system, instead of people getting on stage, talking about their visionary ideas, inspiring people, informing and educating, talking about problems, mentioning problems, talking about solutions, constructive criticism. That’s why I refuse to run a negative campaign. I am definitely not a spoiler. I’m into data, right? I’m a technologist. I’ve got digital DNA. So does most of our campaign team. We’ve got our finger on the pulse.
Most of my major Democratic contacts are really happy to see that we’re running in a red state like Wyoming. Kanye West’s home state is Wyoming. He’s not on the ballot in Wyoming I could say, in part, because he didn’t have Akon on his team. But I could also say that he probably didn’t want to be on the ballot in Wyoming because it’s a red state. He doesn’t want to take additional points in a state where he’s only running against Trump. But we’re on the ballot in Wyoming, and since we’re on the ballot in Wyoming I think it’s safe—more than safe, I think it’s evident—that we are not here to run as a spoiler for the benefit of Donald Trump.
In running for president, you’ve opened yourself up to be scrutinized from every angle going back to the beginning of your career. I wanted to ask you about your time at the Digital Entertainment Network. Can you tell me a little bit about how you started there? You became a vice president as a teenager. What were your qualifications and what was your job exactly?
Well, I was the co-founder. A lot of it was my idea. I had an idea that people would use the internet to watch videos, and we create content for the internet. The idea was basically YouTube and Hulu and Netflix. Anyone that was around in the ‘90s and has been around digital media since then, they all credit us as the creators of basically those ideas. I was just getting a message from the creator of The Vandals, the punk rock band, right before you called. He’s like, “Brock, looks like we’re going to get the Guinness Book of World Records for having created the first streaming television show.”
We did a lot of that stuff. We had 30 television shows. We had the top most prestigious institutions in the world as investors. The biggest names. High-net-worth investors like Terry Semel, who’s chairman and CEO of Warner Brothers, and became the CEO of Yahoo. I did all sorts of things. I helped sell $150,000 worth of advertising contracts to the CEOs of Pepsi and everything else. I was the face of the company, meeting all the major banks and everything else, selling the vision of what the future was.
You moved in with Marc Collins-Rector and Chad Shackley at a mansion in Encino. Was that the headquarters of the business?
All start-ups, they normally start out in your home. Because it’s just you. The company was first started out of Marc’s house, and it was probably there for the first two or three months, before the company got an office. That’s, like, how it is for all start-ups.
were later a co-defendant in the L.A. County case filed against Marc Collins-Rector for plying minors with alcohol and drugs, in order to facilitate sexual abuse. You were dropped from the case, but you settled with one of the men for $21,600. Can you explain that?
Okay, well, first of all, that’s not accurate. Two of the plaintiffs in that case asked me if I would be a plaintiff. Because I refused to be a part of the lawsuit, they chose to include me to discredit me, to make their case stronger. They also went and offered 50 percent of what they got to the house management—they went around and offered money to anyone to participate in this. They needed people to corroborate their story. Eventually, because I refused to participate in the lawsuit, they named me. Subsequently, all three of the plaintiffs apologized to me, in front of audiences, in front of many people, saying Brock never did anything. They dismissed their cases.
Remember, this is a civil thing. I’ve never been charged with a crime in my life. And the last plaintiff to have his case dismissed, he contacted his lawyer and said, “Dismiss this case against Brock. Brock never did anything. I just apologized. Dismiss his case.” And the lawyer said, “No. I won’t dismiss this case, I have all these out-of-pocket expenses, I refuse to file the paperwork unless you give me my out-of-pocket expenses.” And so the lawyer, I guess, had $21,000 in bills. So I paid his lawyer $21,000—not him, it was not a settlement. That was a payment to his lawyer for his out-of-pocket expenses. Out-of-pocket expenses so that he would file the paperwork to dismiss the case.
You’ve said the cases were unfounded, and the plaintiffs eventually apologized. But your boss, Marc Collins-Rector later pleaded guilty to eight charges of child enticement and registered as a sex offender. Were you aware of his behavior? How do you square the fact that later allegations proved to be true, but these ones were not?
Well, remember: I was 16 and 17 years old at the time? So, no. I don’t think Marc is the man they made him out to be. But Marc is not a person I would associate with today, and someone I haven’t associated with in a very long time. I was 16 and 17. I chose the wrong business partner. You live and you learn.
You’ve pointed out that you were underage when most of these allegations were said to take place. Did you ever feel like you were coerced or in over your head while working at DEN?
I mean, I was working 18 hours a day, doing things I’d never done before. It was business school. But I definitely learned a lot in building that company. We raised $88 million. We filed our [form] S-1 to go public. We were the hottest start-up in Los Angeles.
In 2000, you left the country with Marc Collins-Rector. Why did you leave? How did you spend those two years abroad?
I moved to Spain in 1999 for personal reasons. I spent those two years in Europe working on developing my businesses.
Interpol found you in 2002. The house where you were staying reportedly contained guns, machetes, and child pornography. Whose guns and child porn were those? Were you aware they were in the house, and how did those get there?
My lawyers have addressed this in 32 pages of documentation showing a complete absence of wrongdoing. Please refer to my webpage for more information.
[Ed. Note: The webpage does not mention guns, machetes, or child pornography. It does state:“It is true that when the local police arrested Collins-Rector in Spain in 2002 on an international warrant, Mr. Pierce was also taken into custody, but so was everyone at Collins-Rector’s house in Spain; and it is equally clear that Brock was promptly released, and no charges of any kind were ever filed against Brock concerning this matter.”]
What do you make of the allegations against Bryan Singer? [Ed. Note: Bryan Singer, a close friend of Collins-Rector, invested at least $50,000 in DEN. In an Atlantic article outlining Singer’s history of alleged sexual assault and statutory rape, one source claimed that at age 15, Collins-Rector abused him and introduced him to Singer, who then assaulted him in the DEN headquarters.]
I am aware of them and I support of all victims of sexual assault. I will let America’s justice system decide on Singer’s outcome.
In 2011, you spoke at the Mindshift conference supported by Jeffrey Epstein. At that point, he had already been convicted of soliciting prostitution from a minor. Why did you agree to speak?
I had never heard of Jeffrey Epstein. His name was not on the website. I was asked to speak at a conference alongside Nobel Prize winners. It was not a cryptocurrency conference, it was filled with Nobel Prize winners. I was asked to speak alongside Nobel Prize winners on the future of money. I speak at conferences historically, two to three times a week. I was like, “Nobel Prize winners? Sounds great. I’ll happily talk about the future of money with them.” I had no idea who Jeffrey Epstein was. His name was not listed anywhere on the website. Had I known what I know now? I clearly would have never spoken there. But I spoke at a conference that he cosponsored.
What’s your connection to the Clinton Global Initiative? Did you hear about it through Jeffrey Epstein?
I joined the Clinton Global Initiative as a philanthropist in 2006 and was a member for one year. My involvement with the Initiative had no connection to Jeffrey Epstein whatsoever.
You’ve launched your campaign in Minnesota, where George Floyd was killed by a police officer. How do you feel about the civil uprising against police brutality?
I’m from Minnesota. Born and raised. We just had a press conference there, announcing that we’re on the ballot. Former U.S. Senator Dean Barkley was there. So that tells you, when former U.S. Senators are endorsing the candidate, right?
[Ed. note: Barkley was never elected to the United States Senate. In November of 2002, he was appointed by then Minnesota Governor Jesse Venture to fill the seat after Sen. Paul Wellstone died in a plane crash. Barkley’s term ended on Jan. 3, 2003—two months later.]
Yes, George Floyd was murdered in Minneapolis. My vice-presidential running mate Karla Ballard and I, on our last trip to Minnesota together, went to visit the George Floyd Memorial. I believe in law and order. I believe that law and order is foundational to any functioning society. But there is no doubt in my mind that we need reform. These types of events—this is not an isolated incident. This has happened many times before. It’s time for change. We have a lot of detail around policy on this issue that we will be publishing next week. Not just high-level what we think, not just a summary, but detailed policy.
You said that you support “law and order.” What does that mean?
“Law and order” means creating a fair and just legal system where our number one priority is protecting the inalienable rights of “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness” for all people. This means reforming how our police intervene in emergency situations, abolishing private prisons that incentivize mass incarceration, and creating new educational and economic opportunities for our most vulnerable communities. I am dedicated to preventing crime by eliminating the socioeconomic conditions that encourage it.
I support accountability and transparency in government and law enforcement. Some of the key policies I support are requiring body-cams on all law enforcement officers who engage with the public, curtailing the 1033 program that provides local law enforcement agencies with access to military equipment, and abolishing private prisons. Rather than simply defund the police, my administration will take a holistic approach to heal and unite America by ending mass incarceration, police brutality, and racial injustice.
Did you attend any Black Lives Matter protests?
I support all movements aimed at ending racial injustice and inequality. I​ have not attended any Black Lives Matter protests.​ My running-mate, Karla Ballard, attended the March on Washington in support of racial justice and equality.
Your platform doesn’t mention the words “climate change.” Is there a reason for that?
I’m not sure what you mean. Our policy platform specifically references human-caused climate change and we have a plan to restabilize the climate, address environmental degradation, and ensure environmental sustainability.
[Ed. Note: As of writing the Pierce campaign’s policy platform does not specifically reference human-caused climate change.]
You’ve recently brought on Akon as a campaign surrogate. How did that happen? Tell me about that.
Akon and I have been friends for quite some time. I was one of the guys that taught him about Bitcoin. I helped make some videogames for him, I think in 2012. We were talking about Bitcoin, teaching him the ropes, back in 2013. And in 2014, we were both speaking at the Milken Global Conference, and I encouraged him to talk about how Bitcoin, Africa, changed the world. He became the biggest celebrity in the world, talking about Bitcoin at the time. I’m an adviser to his Akoin project, very interested in the work that he’s doing to build a city in Africa.
I think we need a government that’s of, for, and by the people. Akon has huge political aspirations. He obviously was a hugely successful artist. But he also discovered artists like Lady Gaga. So not only is he, himself, a great artist, but he’s also a great identifier and builder of other artists. And he’s been a great businessman, philanthropist. He’s pushing the limits of what can be done. We’re like-minded individuals in that regard. I think he’ll be running for political office one day, because he sees what I see: that we need real change, and we need a government that is of, for, and by the people.
You mentioned that you’re an adviser on Akoin. Do you have any financial investments in Akoin or Akon City?
I don’t believe so. I’d have to check. I have so much stuff. But I don’t believe that I have any economic interests in his stuff. I’d have to verify that. We’ll get back to you. I don’t believe that I have any economic interests. My interest is in helping him. He’s a visionary with big ideas that wants to help things in the world. If I can be of assistance in helping him make the world a better place, I’m all for it. I’m not motivated by money. I’m not running for office because I’m motivated by power. I’m running for office because I’m deeply, deeply concerned about our collective future.
You’ve said you’re running on a pro-technology platform. One week into your campaign last month, a New York appeals court approved the state Attorney General’s attempt to investigate the stablecoin Tether for potentially fraudulent activity. Do you think this will impact your ability to sell people on your tech entrepreneurship?
No, I think my role in Tether is as awesome as it gets. It was my idea. I put it together. But I’ve had no involvement in the company since 2015. I gave all of my equity to the other shareholders. I’ve had zero involvement in the company for almost six years. It was just my idea. I put the initial team together. But I think Tether is one of the most important innovations in the world, certainly. The idea is, I digitized the U.S. dollar. I used technology to digitize currency—existing currency. The U.S. dollar in particular. It’s doing $10 trillion a year. Ten trillion dollars a year of transactional volume. It’s probably the most important innovation in currency since the advent of fiat money. The people that took on the business and ran the business in years to come, they’ve done things I’m not proud of. I’m not sure they’ve done anything criminal. But they certainly did things differently than I would do. But it’s like, you have kids, they turn 18, they go out into the world, and sometimes you’re proud of the things they do, and sometimes you shake your head and go, “Ugh, why did you do that?” I have zero concerns as it relates to me personally. I wish they made better decisions.
What do you think the investigation will find?
I have no idea. The problem that was raised is that there was a $5 million loan between two entities and whether or not they had the right to do that, did they disclose it correctly. There’s been no accusations of, like, embezzlement or anything that bad.
[Ed. Note: The Attorney General’s press release on the investigation reads: “Our investigation has determined that the operators of the ‘Bitfinex’ trading platform, who also control the ‘tether’ virtual currency, have engaged in a cover-up to hide the apparent loss of $850 million dollars of co-mingled client and corporate funds.”]
But there’s been some disclosure things, that is the issue. No one is making any outrageous claims that these are people that have done a bunch of bad—well, on the internet, the media has said that the people behind the business may have been manipulating the price of Bitcoin, but I don’t think that has anything to do with the New York investigation. Again, I’m so not involved, and so not at risk, that I’m not even up to speed on the details.
[Ed note: A representative of the New York State Attorney General told Forbes that he “cannot confirm or deny that the investigation” includes Pierce.]
We’ve recently witnessed the rise of QAnon, the conspiracy theory that Hollywood is an evil cabal of Satanic pedophiles and Trump is the person waging war on them. You mentioned human trafficking, which has become a cause for them. What are your thoughts on that?
I’ve watched some of the content. I think it’s an interesting phenomenon. I’m an internet person, so Anonymous is obviously an organization that has been doing interesting stuff. It’s interesting. I don’t have a big—conspiracy theory stuff is—I guess I have a question for you: What do you think of all of it, since you’re the expert?
You know, I think it’s not true, but I’m not running for president. I do wonder what this politician [Georgia congressional candidate Marjorie Taylor Greene], who’s just won her primary, is going to do on day one, once she finds out there’s no satanic cabal room.
Wait, someone was running for office and won on a QAnon platform, saying that Hollywood did—say what? You’re the expert here.
She won a primary. But I want to push on if we only have a few minutes. In 2006, your gaming company IGE brought on Steve Bannon as an investor. Goldman later bought out most of your stock. Bannon eventually replaced you as CEO of Affinity. You’ve described him as your “right-hand man for, like, seven years.” How well did you know Bannon during that time?
Yes, so this is in my mid-twenties. He wasn’t an investor. He worked for me. He was my banker. He worked for me for three years as my yield guide. And then he was my CEO running the company for another four years. So I haven’t worked with Steve for a decade or so. We worked in videogame stuff and banking. He was at Goldman Sachs. He was not in the political area at the time. But he was a pretty successful banker. He set up Goldman Sachs Los Angeles. So for me, I’d say he did a pretty good job.
During your business relationship, Steve Bannon founded Breitbart News, which has pretty consistently published racist material. How do you feel about Breitbart?
I had no involvement with Breitbart News. As for how I feel about such material, I’m not pleased by any form of hate-mongering. I strongly support the equality of all Americans.
Did you have qualms about Bannon’s role in the 2016 election?
Bannon’s role in the Trump campaign got me to pay closer attention to what he was doing but that’s about it. Whenever you find out that one of your former employees has taken on a role like that, you pay attention.
Bannon served on the board of Cambridge Analytica. A staffer on your campaign, Brittany Kaiser, also served as a business director for them. What are your thoughts on their use of illicitly-obtained Facebook data for campaign promotional material?
Yes, so this will be the last question I can answer because I’ve got to be off for this 5:00 pm. But Brittany Kaiser is a friend of mine. She was the whistleblower of Cambridge Analytica. She came to me and said, “What do I do?” And I said, “Tell the truth. The truth will set you free.”
[Ed. Note: Investigations in Cambridge Analytica took place as early as Nov. 2017, when a U.K. reporter at Channel 4 News recorded their CEO boasting about using “beautiful Ukranian girls” and offers of bribes to discredit political officials. The first whistleblower was Christopher Wylie, who disclosed a cache of documents to The Guardian, published on Mar. 17, 2018. Kaiser’s confession ran five days later, after the scandal made national news. Her association with Cambridge Analytica is not mentioned anywhere on Pierce’s campaign website.]
So I’m glad that people—I’m a supporter of whistleblowers, people that see injustice in the world and something not right happening, and who put themselves in harm’s way to stand up for what they believe in. So I stand up for Brittany Kaiser.
Who do you think [anonymous inventor of Bitcoin] Satoshi Nakamoto is?
We all are Satoshi Nakamoto.
You got married at Burning Man. Have you been attending virtual Burning Man?
I’m running a presidential campaign. So, while I was there in spirit, unfortunately my schedule did not permit me to attend.
OP note: please refer to the original article for reference links within text (as I've not added them here!)
submitted by Leather_Term to Epstein [link] [comments]

This way of life could save the world!

My grandpa once told me: "Listen dipsh*t, if you rely on someone else for your food... then they own you AND your lovely wife."
Well... my crazy grandpa wasn't totally wrong. There is simply too many people on this planet and not enough resources to go around. All the family's generational wealth has been either divided into dust or soaked up by the rich 1%. The division of wealth and power in this world is so unbalanced, it's sick and saddening. Because of this, there are many people struggling who are so tormented and defeated... homeless, unemployed, or working as wage slaves (because overpopulation makes for cheap labor); that they feel like there is no place for them in the future and that suicide is the only option. In our current world, the right to eat, shelter, and drink fresh water are not guaranteed rights to ALL individuals! That fact is absolutely just mind blowing. Who's to blame? Humanity's greed, overpopulation, and poor distribution of efforts and resources, perhaps. (Rant over)
THE ETHICAL SOLUTION of a RADICAL NEW WORLD: In my opinion, The Great Pyramids of Egypt are a simple reminder of Maslow's 6-tier hierarchy of needs. When you take Maslow's pyramid and combined it with a hybrid of Homesteading and Universal Basic Income, something heavenly is born! Regardless of birth race, place, or poverty...I believe all people of earth and all governances should adjoin to fulfill the common goal that each living person has the right to have their Physiological needs met. We NEED to get people gardening and reconnected with their roots! (If we don't, people's nutritionless crappy diets will continue resulting in cancer and disease.) In my opinion, it's what we ALL NEED. I call it Maslow's Ark.
Maslow's Ark - Life on Earth should be modeled after Heaven; with a place and purpose prepared for you when you're born. When born to the Earth, you deserve the right to your basic physiological needs such as food, water, and shelter. (Not to struggle because your dirt poor parents selfishly birthed you to 'duck-tape' their failed marriage together... or because they get a child tax credit! \sarcasm**) We, The United People of Earth in order to transcend Maslow's Physiological needs as a birthright. Achieved by way of hybrid mix of self-sufficient homesteading and Universal Basic Income (UBI) payments. To transform and upgrade shitty land and broken homes into self-sufficient sustainable functional quality 2 or 4 Acre personalized ('green new deal'/ permaculture) homesteads and housing, thereby creating an economy of guaranteed paid jobs with the support of resources from local and world governances centrally focused on preparing places (aka Heavens on earth) for others and future generations. When working for Maslow's Ark, you are essentially doing the work of an Angel. (Biblically speaking, Naoh's Ark was a literal ship, but what is Planet Earth, but one giant Space Ship?) This way of life is my little brain-child and I would like to name it "Maslow's Ark."
We all have Physiological needs to live a fulfilled life. Nobody wants war. Nobody wants death or famine. I want to focus specifically on the 'end-cap' Tiers 1 & 6 of Maslow's pyramid as how they would look if applied to our current world. I think that all countries and individuals with a net wealth over $10m must contribute generously of resources by a majority vote (perhaps) via coordination of the United Nations leverage to kick-start this.
A quick refresher of Maslow's 6-tier pyramid:
Tier 1. Physiological needs - these are biological requirements for human survival, e.g. air, food, water, shelter, clothing, warmth, sex, sleep.
Tier 2. Safety needs - Once an individual’s physiological needs are satisfied, the needs for security and safety become salient. Protection from greed and corruption.
Tier 3. Love and belongingness needs - after physiological and safety needs have been fulfilled, the third level of human needs is social and involves feelings of belongingness. The need for interpersonal relationships motivates behavior
Tier 4. Esteem needs are the fourth level in Maslow’s hierarchy - which Maslow classified into two categories: (i) esteem for oneself (dignity, achievement, mastery, independence) and (ii) the desire for reputation or respect from others (e.g., status, prestige).
Tier 5. Self-actualization needs are the highest level in Maslow's hierarchy, and refer to the realization of a person's potential, self-fulfillment, seeking personal growth and peak experiences. Maslow (1943) describes this level as the desire to accomplish everything that one can, to become the most that one can be.
Tier 6. Transcendence - the very highest and most inclusive or holistic levels of human consciousness, behaving and relating, as ends rather than means, to oneself, to significant others, to human beings in general, to other species, to nature, and to the cosmos. AKA - To Help other's Self-Actualize, beginning with Physiological Needs.
**How it works, in a nut shell:**If you don't have kids, you're a hero and don't need to work much. If you have 1 child, you must work Part-Time for Maslow's Ark. If you have 2 children, you must work Full-Time for Maslow's Ark.
How it will work in detail (Beta v1.3):
No Children Pledge:
  1. At the age of 15, you graduate from a life skills school and may inherit the choice of either: Option A - Inherit a paid-for 2 acre prepared homestead and receive 70% ($840usd per month) UBI Payments. Option B - Assigned a non-arable rent-free apartment with 80% UBI payments ($960us per month). Option C - You live life freestyle, like in an RV, conversion van, or you're homeless, or a homestead/apartment isn't available or prepared for you yet; you shall receive 100% ($1200) UBI payments. *For either option A,B, or C; the child-free individual must perform volunteer work for Maslow's Ark 1 day per week (4 flexible days per month) for 20 years. *Your choice depends on if you preference for living in-town or out-of-town. (The individual may have the opportunity to switch between these, once every 4 years.) *In addition, those who pledge not to have children are awarded a 1oz 24k Gold world medal of honor for serving the duty of your planet for their selfless child-free commitment. AKA If you don't have kids, you don't need to work much. (Through population de-escalation, these people are the real heroes and saviors of planet Earth.) *A married child-free couple may choose to consolidate in one of three ways: A. Consolidate to upgrade into a single 4-acre prepared homestead and each receive 65% ($780usd) UBI payments. C. Consolidate to a single 2-acre prepared homestead and each receive 80% UBI payments ($960us per month). B. Consolidate to upgrade into a non-arable single family home and each receive 85% ($1020usd) UBI payments. D. Consolidate to a single apartment, but each receive 90% ($1,080us) UBI Payments. (It's these individuals that will have the most financial momentum to start a business, be teachers, or become BacheloMaster Degree Students if they choose to pursue higher education with their free time, or for those that love to travel and see the world, and generally be the local economy stimulators.)
  2. For married parents caring for 1 child, When that child turns 2 years of age: Option A - If the parents have consolidated to a single 4-acre prepared homestead, they will each receive a 40% UBI ($480). Option B - If the parents have consolidated to a single 2-acre prepared homestead, they will each receive a 50% UBI ($600). Option C - If the parents have consolidated to a non-arable single-family home they will each receive a 55% UBI ($660). Option D - If the parents have consolidated to a single apartment they will each receive 60% UBI ($720). \In either option A,B,C, or D; the married couple must also commit to paid work for Maslow's Ark a minimum net of 5 days per week for 20 years. The parents may divide the work days between each other as a 0/5 or 2/3 split for example.* **If the couple's net 20 years of work service concludes prior to retirement, then their UBI payment will be 65% each until retirement.
  3. For married parents caring for 2 children, When that child turns 2 years of age: Option A - If the parents have consolidated to a single 4-acre prepared homestead, they will each receive 25% UBI ($300). Option B - If the parents have consolidated to a single 2-acre prepared homestead, they will each receive 30% UBI ($360). Option C - If the parents have consolidated to a non-arable single-family home they will each receive 40% UBI ($480). Option D - If the parents have consolidated to a single apartment they will each receive 45% UBI ($540). \In either option A,B,C, or D; the married couple must also commit to paid work for Maslow's Ark a minimum net of 7 days per week for 20 years. The parents may divide the work days between each other as a 0/7, 2/5, or 3/4 split for example. (The 3/4 split allows someone to always be home for the kids, animals, and vegetable gardens.)* **If the couple's net 20 years of work service concludes prior to retirement, then their UBI payment will be 55% each until retirement.
  4. Adoption: If a married couple with no children elect to adopt an orphan child they are awarded a 1oz 24k Gold world medal of honor for serving the duty of their planet. In addition to each keeping their 100% UBI payments, they also qualify for an additional 30% UBI payment until that child turns 16 (when they will have Maslow's Physiological needs fulfilled as a birthright).
Experimental Extra Options:
  1. An optional 6 acre prepared homestead capped at 20% UBI Payments.
  2. An optional 10 acre prepared homestead capped at 10% UBI Payments.
Universal conditions: -Individuals cannot sell or sub-lease their single family homes, homesteads, or apartments for profit, since they were prepared by The People of Earth, they inherently belong to The People of Earth. -World adoption of a 2-child limit. -Universal Healthcare (including birth control) -Free Education for All -Retirement age is 65, when you receive 90% UBI (instead of Social Security).
How Maslow's Ark Schooling Would Work: Schools would serve the communities multi-functionally; as food banks, seed banks, internship & job connection centers, and teaching children basic life skills. At the heart of every town city and community, there must be an large agricultural center (not just a vampire w-mart), with all the tools and resources needed to grow fruits, vegetables, care for farm animals, and other things like making compost. I propose combining the agricultural center and school as one system. If hungry people in the community desperately need food or seeds, (since the kids are growing food) they can return to their school for food and cheap supplies, functioning as the backbone and heart of every town. All current schools will be converted into large-scale self sufficient homesteads. The governances of the world will fund the solar and wind-powered system upgrades (making them off-grid which give the students a means to learn these systems). Ages 4-10 would be your standard basic Math, Language, Health, Cooking, and History. In addition, 50% of each school day would be learning how to grow food, raise chickens, milk cows, and maintain all aspects of a homestead. (Children will actually care for 2 reasons: A. Everyone loves baby chickens and B. The kids are promised a homestead at 15, and that's SO MUCH BRIGHT & POSITIVE ENERGY! (Unless they choose the apartment...)) (Every human should know how to be self-sufficient!) It's much better for children to during fresh organic milk and vitamin-rich tomatoes anyways, in those early development years. Ages 11-13 would be training in a more specific life-skill trade. Ages 14-15 would be internships where students go to job-sites to learn and assist the parents in Maslow's Ark homestead preparation. Additionally, the schools may also function as a free wholesome dating and room-mate pairing service as well as free marriages. World Governances would fund schools to build homes, (rather than the traditional mortgage) further making schools central work hubs for internships and parents.
Maslow's jobs may include (and be educationally centered around): -Housing & Apartment Rehabilitation (Carpentry, Electrical, Plumbing, HVAC) -Boosting soil Fertility & Compost Creation -Regional Food Gardening, Nurseries, & Research -Planting Permaculture Trees, Arborist, Lumber Mills -Building Greenhouses & Barns -Wood & Gas eventually replaced by fusion energy electricity plants -Solar, Wind, and Battery Technology/Service -Helping care for thy Elderly & Disabled neighbors -Farm Animal Care & breeding -Property, Homes, and Jobs bank coordinator -Small scale Electric Farm Equipment & Electric vehicle production & service. -Clean Water Production such as wells, ponds, rainwater and desalination. -100% Trash Reuse, Repurpose, & Recycling -Teaching all the aforementioned.
The Economy: Self sufficiency means less tax revenue for the government, but at the same time, (the US government is doing a terrible job at creating jobs and unemployment rates are skyrocketing. Capitalist governments don't care if businesses like w-mart or h-depot bleed towns dry of money and killed all the mom n' pop shops, or let robots take over factories. Between the green new deal, and working for Maslow's Ark homesteads, there would be millions of jobs created for regular every-day people. Every house with a big lawn could be retrofit as a homestead. Parents of kids must work, therefore they get charged taxes on their paychecks. Parents without children have a greater allowance to spend money on taxable goods and services. With The People of Earth circumventing the need to spend the bulk of their lives paying for a mortgage and having money tied into their mortgages, you will see a huge shift in people investing in other assets such as stocks, silver, gold, and bitcoin as a means of generational wealth, as it should be. What I also know is that when more people are incentivized to not have kids, the proceeding generations have more space and resources. Population de-escalation creates abundance. I theorize for example: 4 or 5generations from now, you might take 3 established fruiting 2 acre homesteads and combine them into a lavish 6 acre homestead for a single couple, where UBI payments become less and less necessary, until no longer needed. In this case, you'd have an abundance of food for sale, trade and barter, and plenty of gold medals inherited from child-free aunts and uncles. This is much more appealing than the choice of an apartment in a city. I think cities would dissipate and skyscrapers be used for vertical farming. (Like Thanos, without all the death.) (Disclaimer* I'm not an economist.) I would love to hear feedback if you agree or disagree that this would work and suggest improvements to make it work better.
In conclusion, my number and % ratios may need some fine tuning, but I believe this is the only functioning groundwork for the way that a simple and fulfilled life should be. I would love to hear feedback and I hope this concept of hybrid homesteading & % Ratio UBI becomes widely known and built upon.
submitted by MindfulMowgli to homestead [link] [comments]

How YFI came out of nowhere to become the fastest coin to reach $1B and the fastest coin to ever get listed on Coinbase

Note: As mentioned to the original 624 Reddit subscribers, there will be $YFI based Exclusive Original Content released here by myself and others from time to time. These kinds of interactive Deep Dives with a Q&A with fellow Investors / Beta Testers right afterwards is a rare thing in Crypto, and will only be found with this level of immediacy, social interaction, permanence, depth, and complexity of analysis and feedback on a platform like Reddit.

A lot of projects have low innovation, just copying something that someone else has already done, but with small tweaks to things like variables in Smart Contracts. A few rare projects have genuine innovation, providing genuine value to investors and users by providing attractive new products that simplify a lot of things in this space.
Even rarer are the Unicorns that not only have innovation, but they have innovation in spades, oozing out of every pore. $YFI is one of these types of Unicorns. The scope of products and rapidity of release of new revolutionary products of this project has been simply unmatched in the short history of Crypto.
Since 2009, the world of crypto has never seen anything like this lightning fast pace of development spanning such a wide scope of products - optimized automated yield farming and lending that relentlessly hunts the best yields, crypto insurance on Smart Contracts, a revolutionary Stablecoin idea that essentially makes a USD altcoin "smart" with built-in yield farming capabilities for the first time, to name a few - all built by a genius Smart Contract Builder who provided the world the first Fair Launch token.
Key to wrapping your head around the advantages that the yEarn Finance ecosystem has over - well, every single other option out there at this time - are the concepts below:

  1. CeFi vs. DeFi
  2. Composability
  3. Smart Contract Stacking
  4. The power of a Talented and Diverse DAO

To discuss these concepts, and to educate beginners, we have to understand what the terms above truly mean. This post doesn't discuss any particular products and their advantages, only the systemic advantages that are available only to $YFI. This project seems to attract the smartest and the highest risk taking of crypto investors, and an important thing in truly understanding all of the risks involved, is that you have to know the terms and concepts first. Even veteran crypto and DeFi users may be thrown for a loop by some of the innovative products and concepts that keep coming out of the YFI Labs.
This project is going through an expansion phase, where the scope of everything and the reach of the various released products is increasing (Insurance, A truly pegged Stablecoin, yETH Version 2, ySwap, yLiquidate, etc, etc..)
You know that there's some motherforker or twenty that is now just avidly waiting for every piece of code that Andre drops onto GitHub, so that they can be among the first to copy it verbatim then claim it as "their own variation" because they changed some variables and titles. Yawn.
From the definitive glossary for the DeFi space - yet another $YFI innovation - I'll list their definitions below. These may not be their final definitions when I finish any V1.1 edits to it, but they're good enough for now, and at least 3 or more YFI Dev Team members have read, reviewed, or edited these definitions. I've also invited my fellow Beta testers to provide comments to my RFC on this subreddit and in the Governance forum (among the documentation volunteers).
Yes, this is how early DeFi investors are in the development and maturation of the DeFi space. Anyone reading this right now is so early into DeFi's evolution that the terms used for this space are literally still being finalized by the community.
I've given a little bit of a sneak peek into how technical documentation is somehow self-organized in a powerful DAO such as this one. In this example, it starts off with a call for help on Twitter to improve our documentation by tracheopteryx. Interested and qualified volunteers show up (or don't) when such a call is made.
Your writers and editors have spent many a moment pondering off into space debating whether this term really means this or that, or if the term was either succinctly described, or fully sufficient. It's a usually thankless and anonymous job, that is critical in providing enough relevant information to its users and investors. [Note: Just like anything you see related to the $YFI project: You can help us improve this documentation - any of it - if you see errors or better ways of describing this information.]
All terms are shamelessly plagiarized from myself and my fellow writeeditors - u/tracheopteryx and Franklin - from the draft definitions in our new DeFi glossary: https://docs.yearn.finance/defi-glossary

1. CeFi vs. DeFi
CeFi - Centralized Finance. In terms of cryptocurrency, CeFi is represented by centralized cryptocurrency exchanges, businesses or organizations with a physical address, and usually with some sort of corporate structure. These CeFi businesses must follow all applicable laws, rules, and regulations in each country, state, or region in which they operate.
DeFi - DeFi, or Decentralized Finance, is at its root a set of Smart Contracts running independently on blockchains such as the Ethereum network. Smart Contracts may or may not interact with other smart contracts and even other blockchains.
The goal of DeFi is to enhance profitability of investors in DeFi through automated smart contracts seeking to maximize yields for invested funds. DeFi is marked by rapid innovative progression and testing of new ideas and concepts.
DeFi often involves high risk investing sometimes involving smart contracts that have not been audited or even thoroughly reviewed (a review is not as comprehensive as an audit, but may be also be included as part of an audit). Due to this and other reasons, DeFi is conventionally considered to be more risky than CeFi or traditional investing.
Comment: DeFi is higher risk, partly because it moves so fast. A lot of yams, hot dogs, and sushi can get lost when you move so fast that you can't even bother to do a thorough audit before releasing code. The cream of the crop projects will all have had multiple audits done by multiple independent auditors. Auditors are expensive. At such an embryonic stage, most projects can't afford to have one audit done let alone 5.
But if you can live with that higher risk intrinsic in DeFi and be willing to be a part of "testing in prod," then financial innovation can truly blossom. And if you let your best and brightest members of your community focus only on doing what they do best, then they don't have to bother to try to grow a business like a Bezos, Musk, or a Zuckerberg. Innovative entrepreneurs in this mold such as Andre, don't have to even try to do this business growth on their own because the DAO sets it up so that they don't have to do this. The DAO both grows the business while supporting and allowing these innovators to simply innovate, instead of trying to get nerds to do backroom deals to gain market share and access to new customers. It turns out that nerds are much more productive when you just let them be a nerd in their labs.

  1. Composability
Composability - The measure of the usability and ability of a product to be used as a building block (or "money lego") in the construction of other products or domains. A protocol that is simple, powerful, and that functions well with other protocols would be considered to have high composability.
Comment: The maturity of the cryptocurrency ecosystem and the evolution of composable building tools in the DeFi space now make new products and concepts available. $YFI would not have been possible only 2 or 3 years ago; the tools and ecosystem simply weren't ready for it yet.
This is why only now are you and many other now hearing about YFI. In 2018, Andre began providing free code reviews to Crypto Briefing. Andre had to learn to walk before he could run, and the composable tools needed to work on embryonic ideas in his head were simply not ready or available then. By reading and reviewing so many Smart Contracts he learned to recognize good code from bad code at what was still a very early stage in Smart Contract development in 2018, only 3 years after ETH's launch in July 2015.

  1. Smart Contract Stacking
Smart Contracts - A digital contract that is programmed in a language that is considered Turing complete, meaning that with enough processing power and time, a properly programmed Smart Contract should be able to use its code base and logical algorithms to perform almost any digital task or process. Ethereum's programming languages, such as Solidity and Vyper, are Turing complete.
Comment: Smart Contracts have actually gotten smarter since ETH launched in July 2015. It's because Smart Contract builders needed to learn Solidity and how it functions and interoperates before they could spread their wings as designers. With more time and experience under their belts, the early SC builders that stuck to it have gotten much better.
In Andre Cronje, we may have been witness to the rise of the next Satoshi or Vitalik of crypto. There is a reason that a couple of days ago, I counted 6 of 41 YF clones - nearly 15% - among the top gainers on the day. Success breeds copycats showing a ton of flattery. A smart contract is so smart, it can be used to be stacked upon other smart contracts such as at Aave or Maker.
True innovation takes time, sacrifice, blood, sweat, and tears. It does not come without cost to those doing the innovating.
There is not a single project in DeFi, CeFi, or even all of cryptocurrency that can claim the breadth and diversity of innovation and product reach that is found in the $YFI ecosystem. As a tech investor and professional nerd who's been involved at Research Labs and around product development and testing since before the year 2000. Prior to that I've ready widely and keenly to keep up with technological changes and assess investment potential in these disruptive changes nearly my whole life.
The amount of innovation shown in this project is breathtaking if you're a Tech or FinTech researcher. It's being released at a ridiculously rapid pace that is simply unmatched in any private or government research lab anywhere, let alone at any CeFi or traditional financial institution one can name. The only comparable levels of innovation shown by this young project is typically only seen during periods of epochal changes such as The Renaissance or times of strife and war, such as World War II.
Unless you've been in the industry and working with coders: I don't think those that haven't been around software development and testing can understand, can truly grasp that no one, no group does this. This isn't normal. This rapid-fire release of truly innovative code and intelligent strategies would have to be comparable to some of the greatest creative periods of human ingenuity and creativity. It's truly on par with periods of brilliance seen by thinkers like Newton, Einstein and Tesla, except with software code and concepts in decentralized finance. When the history of FinTech writes this chapter in its history, $YFI may need its own section or chapter.
Don't forget all of these financial instruments we take for granted all around us, all had a simple start somewhere, whether it was an IOU system of credit, insurance, stocks, bonds, derivatives, futures, options, and so on...they all started off as an idea somewhere that had to get tested sooner or later "in production."
One brilliant aspect of $YFI Smart Contracts is that they're built as a profitable layer atop existing DeFi protocols, extracting further value from base crypto assets and even primary crypto derivatives. $YFI is built atop existing smart contracts to create further value where there was none before, and help maximize gains for long term investors.

  1. The Power of a Talented and Diverse DAO
DAO - Distributed Autonomous Organization. The first DAO was started in 2016. According to Wikipedia's definition, it is an: "organization represented by rules encoded as a computer program that is transparent, controlled by the organization members and not influenced by a central government. A DAO's financial transaction record and program rules are maintained on a blockchain."
When implemented well, a DAO allows for real world experiments in decentralized democratic organization and control, with more freedom of action and less regulatory oversight for DAO controlled projects and products when compared to legacy corporate structures and organizations.
Comment: yEarn Finance has shown us what a properly motivated and sufficiently powerful DAO can do in a short amount of time.
There's many reasons why this project with an already profitable business model is the fastest original project in history to ever reach a $1B marketcap in any market - traditional or crypto - accomplishing this amazing feat in less than two months. There's reasons why this is probably the fastest coin in history to get listed on Coinbase in less than 2 months.
The power of a sufficiently talented and diverse development team and community is stunning in its power, speed, and ability to get things done quickly. There are risks aplenty with parts of this project, but $YFI is now seen as a "safe" place in DeFi, because you know you that as far as yield farming you probably couldn't do it better yourself unless you took a chance on unaudited code with anonymous Devs, or you were doing the trading equivalent of throwing darts blindfolded and somehow won, except that you even more improbably kept doing that over and over and winning.

Summary: There's reasons why YFI has been called the Bitcoin of DeFi and the Berkshire Hathaway Series A of crypto. I've listed some of the reasons above. The confluence of these 4 factors has helped lead to explosive growth for this project.
This isn't financial advice as I'm not a financial pro but make no mistake: as a Crypto OG around crypto since early 2013, who was deeply involved in multiple community projects as an early organizer, and who was a small investor during the DotCom era investing in early giants that went on to be gorillas, I don't say this lightly that the $YFI project is lightning in a bottle and a diamond in the rough.
What $YFI allows, when all is said and done, is the rapid fire implementation of great ideas that have gone through a rapid Darwinian evolution, where only the best ideas are implemented. Thoughts and ideas are powerful things. The valuation of this coin and ecosystem has to, it must take into account that this nascent financial innovation hub and ecosystem actually works and allows the best of these ideas to actually blossom rapidly.
You just don't find too many gems like this.
submitted by CryptoOGkauai to yearn_finance [link] [comments]

Attention incoming interns! Here's a list of TIPS I WISH I KNEW starting my intern year, some things you can start working on now and some less commonly discussed but very important parts of your job

It’s that time of year and yet again I’ve seen plenty of incoming interns asking what they can do to prepare. I wrote this post to share some tips for all of the not-exactly-medical stuff I wish I knew before I started intern year and to share a few things that interns can do before they start to feel like they’re well prepared for the long white coat.
As a quick background, I was a surgery intern in the first half of the 2010s and much of this is informed by my notes and memories from that time in addition to everything I’ve learned since, particularly about professionalism both in medicine and in the business world with work I’ve done in the healthcare startup arena. I’m also not perfect and very much a work in progress myself and, outside the intern-specific items here, I try to do most of these things myself—sometimes more successfully than others.
So take what you think are good ideas here, leave what you don’t think would be useful, and if anyone else has anything to add, please feel free to chime in.
TL;DR: Intern year is hard. Here are some not-so-commonly-disucussed tips that may help.

Mindset

1. Being an effective intern is, at its core, about being responsible, effective and reliable.

Your day to day responsibilities are nearly always dominated by the need to get things done and to do so in a manner that lets your other team members focus on their own roles and responsibilities. What about learning clinical medicine? You'll learn plenty and fast. Don't worry.
When reading through these tips below, view them from an angle of “would this help me develop an effective system for making sure everything gets done and nothing falls through the cracks?”

2. For your in-the-hospital life as well as your outside-the-hospital life, remember this one thing: you will forget.

You will be busy and have responsibilities in a way you likely have never experienced before. This will naturally make the day-to-day things in life more difficult than you’re used to so developing ways to outsmart your forgetful brain will pay off.

3. You are a professional now. This is your career. You’re in it.

It’s easy to view your life as a trainee as a sort of advanced student or something in between a student and a “real doctor”. But that’s not true. View yourself as a professional building your career. Your intern year is just the first step of that career. You’re a real doctor as much as any other now.

4. One of the hardest things about being an intern or resident is dealing with feelings of isolation. It will take work to actively manage and overcome those feelings.

Imposter syndrome, feeling like you don’t know what you’re doing or that you don’t belong, feeling like you’re not the person you used to be, that you don’t have time to do all the “normal” things that other people do, thinking your co-residents or attendings think you’re dumb, feeling that you don’t have time for friends/family/hobbies, ruminating on “what if I screw this up and hurt a patient?”, or “this doesn’t matter -- the patient is going to XX or YY anyway” etc are all common feelings and they all share the same undercurrent of feeling isolated in one way or another. You need to actively work to find ways to confront and overcome these feelings or else they will control you. When they control you, you’re burned out.
It may not seem like it at first, but nearly every single tip below is geared towards avoiding feelings of isolation. Feeling like you’re not in control of your finances will make you feel isolated. Feeling like you’re losing a handle on your relationships will make you feel isolated. Feeling like you’re behind on your email and haven’t done all the little things in life you need to do will make you feel isolated. Read these tips through that lens.

What you can do before you start

1. Organize and update your contacts. Seriously.

Here are some ways it can help you maintain and grow your relationships.
  • Use the ‘Notes’ feature in your contacts for everyone important in your life and all the new people meet.
    • You will forget your friends’ kids names and ages. Every time you get a birth announcement or see a post on social media, go to your friend’s contact, edit the notes and put in the info. Then, when you reach out to your friends, ask about their kids...by name.
    • You will forget your friends’ boyfriend/girlfriend/wife/husband/partner’s name, especially if you’ve never met them or haven’t seen them for a long time. Put their name in your friends’ card with a note like “Started seeing Sam in June 2020, he/she’s a software engineer”. Someone you know gets married? Add their wedding date to their card.
    • You will forget how you knew people in your contacts. Met at a conference? Was a medical student on your heme onc service? Friend-of-a-friend you met at a wedding? Someone shares an interest you have? Make a note in their contact card. Tip: these notes are for you, not them. So if someone reminds you of an actor, or didn’t stop talking about bitcoin, make a note. It will help because you will forget.
  • Tag your contacts or add them to lists and use those tags/lists to your advantage.
    • Make lists or tags for your family, your medical school friends, your undergrad friends, your coresidents, your attendings, your medical students, the hospitals you’ll be working at, etc. Put those lists or tags to use like this:
      • You will forget to stay in touch with people important to you. Set reminders in your phone for every week / two weeks / month, etc to pull up a list (family, medical school friends, etc), pick someone on that list you haven’t chatted with in a while and text them and ask them how they’re doing. Aim to start a conversation, ask about what’s happening in their life. Texts are more personal and meaningful than liking a post on social media or sharing a meme. Initiating conversations with your friends and family will help you feel connected and will increase the likelihood they reach out to you.
      • Don’t label your medical students like “MS3 Laura” or “Sub-I Juan”, etc. Label them with their full name and treat them like the colleagues they are. Put them on a list, clear it out next year if you want, but don’t treat them as “MS3 XXX“ or “MS4 YYY”. I’m sure you remember feeling like a nameless/faceless medical student at times in school and I’m sure you didn’t love it. So don’t repeat that behavior. Add a note or two about them while you’re at it. Take enough interest in your medical students to treat them well. You never know when or how you’ll cross paths with them again.
      • If you rotate through different hospitals, you will forget which “ED” or “PACU” or “nursing station 3rd floor” numbers are which. Tag them or put them on a list. It’ll make finding them when you need them much easier.

2. Use a good note taking app and a good task manager app to help with both your in-hospital life and your outside-of-the-hospital life.

Here are some ways to use a notes app.
  • Make a note for each rotation you’re on. Add in any unstructured tips as they come up, like “Send all of Dr. X’s patients home with Y”, “Use the call room in the basement outside of the locker room, passcode 1234”, “Park in the X lot on the weekends”, “Dr. A likes to manage Z with Y”, “The case manager, NAME, usually sits at the computer behind the 2nd floor nurses station”, etc. Don't overthink them, just write them down when they come up. Review those notes the next time you rotate through because you will forget all those little things and they will help you in the future.
  • Create a master grocery list of all things you typically get at the grocery store. Share it with a roommate/partner so they can keep it updated too. That way if you ever stop to pick something up, you can review the list to make sure there’s nothing you’ll forget.
    • Make master lists for other things in your life too like “packing for a conference”, “packing for a family trip”, “Target/Wal-Mart household master list” so you can quickly review anytime something comes up so you minimize the chance of forgetting something
  • Make notes for all of the other stuff you have to manage in your life like your car, your apartment/house, your loans, etc and update them every time you work on that thing. Change your loan repayment? Add it to the note. Have to get your brakes fixed? Add to the note where you got it done, how much it cost, etc. Talk to your landlord about fixing the shower? Add it to the note. Have to call the medical board to sort something out with a license? Add it to the note.
  • I like two note apps on iOS: Bear for personal notes since it’s fast and has great tagging and Apple’s Notes app for shared notes
Pick a good task manager app and use it for all the things in your life that aren’t your day-to-day work
  • Cousin getting married and you can go to the wedding? Make tasks to ensure your time off, book your travel, buy a gift, rent a hotel room, etc. Then put all the relevant info into your note because...you will forget.
  • Pandemic is over and you get to present a poster at a conference? Make tasks to review your draft with your coauthors, print your poster, book your travel, submit your reimbursement, etc. Then put all the relevant info into a note. Otherwise, you’ll forget.
  • I like Things and have also liked OmniFocus. There is a ton of content on how to set one of these things up for productivity so review it and use it YouTube search

3. Take charge of your finances

When I was an intern, I figured all I had to do was pay my loans and not go into more debt. I wish I had done the following instead:
  1. Read these two books: The White Coat Investor and I Will Teach You To Be Rich. Both are very good and have different strengths. The WCI is directly applicable to you and will help educate you in ways medical school didn’t about your financial future. IWTYTBR is much more of a “millennial” book but it’s very good for explaining big concepts and for providing a system to set yourself up for success. They’re both easy and relatively quick reads and don’t require any financial background. WCI is fine as an e-book but IWTY has a bunch of dialog boxes that make the e-book a poor experience, get a physical new or used copy.
  2. Set up a budget. I use and swear by You Need A Budget. It’s the best money I spend every year. Their system is easy and straightforward and it doesn’t take long to get the hang of it. I can’t recommend it highly enough.

4. Update your CV now and keep it updated regularly

You will no doubt have to share your CV with someone at some point whether it’s for fellowship or a research project or any number of things. The time to work on it is not when someone says “can you share your CV?” -- that’s a recipe for omissions, typos and mistakes. The only thing you should be doing every time you share your CV is giving it a quick once-over to make sure you don’t spot any mistakes and to make sure it’s up to date
There are plenty of templates online and your training institution may even have a preferred format somewhere on their website. Your ERAS application will give you a good head start but most of your medical school CV lines will either be condensed or removed all together unless something was particularly notable. You can almost always find example CVs online from senior people in your department or institution with a quick web search -- use a few as a guide
Set a reminder / task to update your CV at regular intervals. Quarterly is good, yearly at least. Save new versions of it each time so you can refer to the old ones if you need to and name them in a way to let you know you’re always sharing the most recent version, e.g., LASTNAME_FIRST NAME_CV_2020-06. You will forget if the one marked “CV” only is the right one you want to share.

5. Subscribe to a couple of newsletters to stay up to date with the world outside of your hospital

  • For general news, your preferred newspaper probably has a daily email briefing. Otherwise, Axios AM/PM and Politico’s Playbook are both very good quick reads to stay up to date with current events.
    • Keep up with healthcare news so you know what’s going on in the healthcare system broadly
      • Axios Vitals is a great, quick daily healthcare news update
      • Politico’s Pulse and Morning eHealth are both very good and have quick facts at the beginning if you just want to skim
      • Rock Health’s Rock Weekly is a decent summary of each week in the healthcare startup and technology world
Pick a few of these and aim to get through them each day. If you can’t get through them, unsubscribe to the ones you think are least relevant to you so you never feel “behind” in staying up with the news. You can breeze through the few you pick in a few minutes here and there throughout the day -- don’t make it any harder than that to feel like you’re “up to date” on the news.

General tips for maintaining relationships

  • For any romantic relationship, do these things if you don’t already:
 1. Make a rule: no phones at the table. * Don’t put your phone on the table face-up. Don’t put your phone on the table face-down. Keep your phone off the table and set to silent. * Focus on the person in front of you and show them you care about them by paying attention to them. We all know what it feels like to be with someone more interested in their screen than in interacting with you. If you’re on call, say “sorry, I’m on call, I may have to check something here and there”, apologize if you do check it and then put your phone away. 2. Make another rule: no phones in bed * Same principle as at the table. Want to feel like two strangers just passing through life who just so happen to share the same bed? Wake up, reach for your phone and scroll through your feeds like a zombie before getting out of bed. Same idea before bed. Your phone can wait. 3. If you’re at the point where you share finances, set a regular meeting to review how you’re doing. * Ideally, this is a “red, yellow or green” meeting and should only take a few minutes. Money can be a big conflict issue for relationships and avoiding talking about money is a surefire way to eventually turn to conflict. If you have a budget and shared goals, this should be quick. * A monthly check-in is good. Create a recurring calendar event, attach the shared notes or spreadsheet document you use, add your goals for the meeting and honor the meeting when it comes around. 
  • Eat with people who are important to you, if you can.
    • There’s something about sharing a meal that’s special in human nature. Friends who are important to you? Partners? Mentors you’re looking to get to know better after you’ve had a few chats? Try to eat with them when you can. And keep your phone off the table.
    • The same idea works with your coresidents and teams in the hospital. Eat with them if you can. Eating with others builds, strengthens and maintains relationships. Keep your phone off the table if you can.
Think about it this way: who would you consider a better mentor, the person you’ve met with a few times in their office where they sit behind their desk and you in front of them while they glance at their computer screen every time it pings or the person who’s invited you to get coffee or food and they kept their phone away the whole time? Now turn that around and realize the power of the message you can send to people you care about by trying to eat with them and show them they have your full attention.

Hospital tips

1. Learn to think about tasks as a continuum from start to finish instead of as a binary 'done/not done'.

Let’s say you have to order a CT for a patient of yours.
  • Instead of marking the task as complete the second you place the order for the CT, recognize that the whole task is not just placing the order, but also knowing when your patient is going down to the scanner, when they’re back, when the CT is up in the system, when the report is up and also that you’ve looked at the CT yourself and have read the report.
  • When your senior or attending asks you, “Did patient X get their CT?”, a not-so-great answer is “Yes” or “No”. A better answer is “they’re down at the scanner now” or “the scan’s done but it hasn’t been read yet. Want to look at it?” or “Yes, it’s negative for XXX but did show YYY”.
Whatever system you eventually adopt for your day-to-day task management in the hospital, whether it’s a list or index cards or a printed signout sheet, make sure you’re tracking both when orders go in, when they’re complete, when they’re cancelled, etc. Just marking things as complete once you place the order isn’t enough.

2. Signout is taken, not given.

What I mean by this is that when you take signout, that means you’re accepting responsibility for those patients. They might be your patients, you might be cross-covering, it doesn’t matter. What matters is that when those patients are your responsibility, it’s your responsibility to get what you need to know to take care of them.
Is someone signing out to you in a hurry and not giving you what you need? Ask them for that relevant past medical history, those exam findings, and so on. It’s not enough for the person handing off to say “we’re worried about x or y”, you’ve got to follow that up with “in case of x or y, is there a plan for what the team wants me to do?”. Get the answers you need.
A lot of covering patients on call is playing defense whereas the primary team generally plays offense. But that doesn’t mean you can play defense in isolation. The last thing you want is for the primary team to feel surprised by your choices.
 * Here’s two ways for the above example to go when turning the patients you were covering back over the next day or whatever: 1. You: “For patient so-and-so, you said you were worried about x or y. Y happened.” Them: “What did you do?”. You: “Z”. Them: “Shit, my attending’s not gonna like that”. 2. You “Y happened so I did A like you said, it went fine and here’s the current status”. Them: “Great, thanks” * See the difference? 
  • Along the lines of taking responsibility for those patients, that means that if you couldn’t get the information you needed at signout then you have to go and see those patients and get the information you need yourself.
    • You’ll hear this idea said a bunch of different ways like “trust but verify”, “trust no one” and your comfort level will change over the year as you become more confident and comfortable. But always error on the side of going to see the patient and getting your own information at the start.

3. If you will be miserable without something when you’re in the hospital, bring it with you. You won’t reliably be able to find it at the hospital every time you need it.

  • Need coffee otherwise you turn into a demon? Bring it with you. You never know when you’ll get caught doing something and won’t be able to run to the cafeteria for your fix.
  • On call overnight and know you need food so you don’t go insane? Bring it with you. Here’s a hospital food rule: never rely on the hospital's ability to feed you. The hospital will let you down sooner or later, I guarantee it.
  • Know you always get cold on call? The day you forget your jacket/sweatshirt is the day you won’t be able to find a spare blanket in the hospital to save your life. Put a backup in your locker (if your hospital respects you enough to give you one).

Miscellaneous productivity, professionalism and lifestyle tips

1. Aim to “touch” everything only once

  • Example: your physical mail. You know, the stuff made of dead trees that accumulates in that box you check every once in a while. For every piece of mail you get, you should either trash it, file it, or act on it. Don’t touch it until you’re ready to do one of those things.
  • Example: your email. Either delete it, archive it, reply to it or do the thing it’s telling you to do right away. Don’t fall into the trap of using your inbox as a to-do list -- that’s a recipe to get burned. Use a task manager for your to-do list and aim to keep your inbox at zero. Realize that email’s true power is communication and use it as a communication tool and nothing else.
  • I’ll use the example of going to a wedding again as something to “touch once”. Aim to accomplish all the tasks at once or at least create tasks and reminders to complete those tasks all in one go. Respond to the RSVP, create the calendar invite with all the information from the invitation, share the calendar event with your date, book your travel, book your hotel, book your rental car, buy your gift from the registry and set a reminder to get your suit/dress cleaned a few weeks ahead, etc.

2. Lean to use your calendar as a tool

Professionals in the “real world” tend to live and die by their calendars. Some people, especially many senior people in medicine, don’t manage their own calendars. But you manage yours. With it you can:
  • Make sure all events—even small ones like dates or errands you want to run—have locations so all you have to do is click the location for directions
  • Send invites to friends / family / coworkers for anything you talk about doing that has the relevant info
  • Make reminders for yourself to prepare for upcoming events, i.e.., don’t count on seeing your parents’/spouses’/whomever’s birthday “coming up” to remind you to get a gift or send a card. Create an event two weeks before their birthday that says “Buy Mom a birthday card”, set it to repeat yearly and buy a card when it comes up, send it a few days later and don’t worry that it won’t get there in time.

3. Learn to use email well

Ever get an email from someone and feel their tone was terse, condescending or rude? Don’t be that person. Error on the side being polite and professional and writing in complete sentences without textspeak. It’s not hard — you type fast, even with your thumbs, I’m sure of it.
  • Learn to communicate effectively. Keep it short but not terse. State why you’re writing to someone, be clear if you’re asking a question, and think about it this way: “How am I making it as easy as possible for this person to understand why I’m emailing them and do what I’m asking them to do?
  • Don’t use a canned salutation like “Best, NAME” or even worse: “Best, INITIALS”. Use your salutation to continue to communicate your message and remember that politeness and professionalism extend through your signature.
    • I don’t know why “Best,” is so common in medicine but it’s meaningless, unthoughtful, inherently passive aggressive and I seriously read it as if the person writing it were signing off by saying “Go f*ck yourself,”. Same thing for “Regards,” and its ilk, any abbreviation like “vr,” or any form of cutesy quote.
    • Write your salutation fresh each time. Did you ask someone for something? Say “Thank you for your help”. Are you writing someone senior to you and want to sound somewhat formal? “Sincerely,” never goes out of style. Are you sharing information and essentially writing a memo? Use “Please let me know if you have any questions”. Your salutation is communication, treat it that way.
    • Sign with your name, not your initials. Signing with initials is a common way senior people will try to remind you they’re senior to you. If you do it, it’s like you’re trying to prove you’re a Cool Guy Big Shot too. It never comes across well -- even for those senior people. Initials are terse. Lowercase initials are even terser. Although they may look different at first glance, all initial signatures functionally come across as ‘FU’. Write your name.
      • If it’s a few rounds back and forth of email, it’s normal drop salutations and signatures and treat email more like texting. Keep using complete sentences without textspeak, though. I promise you’ll come across better that way.
    • Use the ‘signature’ feature of your email client to share your professional details and contact information
      • Your institution (not department) will hopefully have a format for this that’s standardized and includes minimal or no graphics. If it doesn't, then I feel sorry for all the inevitable IT headaches you will eventually endure at your institution since they clearly underfund and undervalue contemporary IT and professional services. It’s the wild west out there so find some good examples of clean, professional signature formats and make one for yourself.
      • Note: this signature lives below your salutation and sign off. It’s essentially the letterhead for your email that lets your recipient fill in the details you may not otherwise provide like your department, mailing address or fax number. It’s not a replacement for signing off of your communication professionally.
    • Never use bold, italics, underlines or different font sizes in your emails. They only make emails harder to read and jumble your message.
  • If you want to highlight something, put it in a numbered or bulleted list.
    • If you can’t communicate what you want with 2-3 bulleted points, then email is not the right medium to use. Do you like reading long emails? Of course you don’t. Write a memo, attach it as a PDF or shared doc and use the email to tell your recipients to review the attachment.
  • You will eventually, in some way or another, ask someone to introduce you to one of their contacts and or refer you for something. Learn how to write a good forwardable email that utilizes the double opt-in concept and how to make it easy on the person doing you the favor. Read more here, here and here.
    • While you’re at it, understand the power of using CC and BCC to communicate effectively.
  • Aim to answer all emails written directly to you within 24 hours.
    • If you can’t respond fully right away, respond briefly saying you got the note and that you’ll work on it and get back to them. Set a reminder or create a task to do or review the thing and get back to them once you’ve done it.
    • Do you hate being left on read in text? You do it in email every time you don’t respond to someone in a timely fashion. It’s better to share a quick, “I got it and I’m working on it message” then not replying until days or weeks later.

4. Don’t let someone else’s negative energy and/or anxiety transfer to you

You will frequently experience things like this in the hospital:
  • A co-resident disagrees with a management decision made at rounds and mentions that so-and-so is an idiot. So-and-so probably isn’t an idiot. Your co-resident probably isn’t an idiot either. Form your own opinions from your own experiences.
  • A nurse pages you with a tone that says “THIS IS REALLY BAD”. It might be, go and see. And on your way, stay calm and go over the steps in your head of what you’d do if it is, in fact, REALLY BAD. But don’t freak yourself out before you even get to the room. You won’t be able to make decisions with a clear head if you’re already worked up.
  • You’re a surgery intern and all your patients are normally on the med-surg floor. Every once in a while, one goes somewhere like heme-onc if the med-surg floor is full. Someone on your team says something like “great, now they’re going to screw up our patient”. Recognize that that floor isn’t full of terrible nurses and may just have less experiences with lines and drains and that the best thing you can do is go down there, talk to the nurse and say “here’s what we want to be called about” and “this thing may look bad but it usually isn’t and we don’t need to be called, here’s why”, and so on. Doing things like this will mean you get fewer calls. Fewer calls are good.
  • Your attending is having a bad day and you’re not enjoying your interactions with them. Don’t let that make you have a bad day too. Medicine is hard enough as it is, stick to your own bad days instead adopting other people’s. Then pull up your friend list, text a buddy and feel better.

5. Don’t neglect your physical health. Trying to eat well and stay active are even more important when you’re insanely busy.

The #1 thing you can do to help your waistline is cook your own food and pack your own meals. It doesn’t matter what you cook or how good of a cook you are, as long as you’re aiming to pack meals that an adult would eat, it will be healthier than takeout and cafeteria food. It’s better for portion control, you control all the ingredients and you get a sense of satisfaction for being on the ball. It’s better in every way.
I know it’s not realistic to always prep and pack your own food on the busiest of services but you should try to hit at least a percentage like 25% or 50% of your meals. There are no lost causes in your own health.
It will be hard to exercise and work out. You should still try to do it anyway. You will go long stretches without exercising at times. Don’t beat yourself up about it. Every day is a chance to do the thing you want to do so get back out there.

6. If your social profiles are private, consider doing some housekeeping and making them public.

Instead of thinking about them as a liability to be that needs to be hidden, think about them as a narrative you can control.
Nothing is private on the internet. Even your private profile. You never know who knows someone you know or what may get screenshotted and shared down the line.
It’s natural to run a web search on anyone you’re meeting for a date, interviewing with for a job, or researching in general. When you search your own name, what comes up? What do you think when you’re searching for someone and they have a private page? Do you ever click on a few links to see professional stuff from LinkedIn, and then some social pages to see what else you learn? So does everyone else.
Use your social pages to put forward a version of you that shows who you are, shows some interests true to yourself, makes you seem like a totally normal and reliable person (which is exactly what any potential date, partner, fellowship director or hiring manager is asking themselves about you) and doesn’t share enough information to let a patient show up at your door.
Medicine lags behind other industries with people still commonly hiding behind private pages. In the tech world, it’s more strange to not have a public page. A private page says more about you that you might want to hide red flags whereas a public page says “go ahead and look, you won’t find any red flags”. One is much more powerful than the other.

Closing and something to read

When you view your professional life, it’s natural to view your professional relationships as being a binary one between patient and physician. That’s certainly essential and certainly important, but as a professional you now have relationships to consider with so many more types of people: co-residents, faculty in your department, faculty in other departments, administrators, support staff, medical students, and so on.
Just as you had to learn how to work with patients, you will have to learn to work with all of the other people in your professional life. Truly effective professionals will treat all interactions importantly and give thought and consideration to each one. All these interactions and relationships will all affect your day-to-day experience, your well-being and, ultimately, your professional experience.
You will find yourself being not just responsible for your patients, but also for yourself, your career and your relationships. It takes effort to succeed in all of those areas. And even with effort, sometimes you’ll be winning in an area and losing in others. And in a few months it will be different -- that’s just life.
I want you to consider looking outside of books and resources written specifically for physicians when you’re trying to tackle these issues inside the hospital and out.
Medicine is a much-smaller-than-you-realize bubble with a long history of personality-driven examples of “that’s just the way we do it” or “that’s how we’ve always done it”. There are good books about medicine out there, to be sure, but you’ll benefit more professionally by learning from the wide world outside of hospitals since there are quite simply many more successful and accomplished people who’ve written great resources for all aspects of professional life that medicine tends to ignore.
I’d recommend you start with this book: Andy Grove’s High Output Management (a review by another Valley titan here). Andy escaped communist Hungary, taught himself English and rose to be CEO of Intel and went on to be a sage of Silicon Valley before he passed. This book is a how-to guide for how to be an effective professional in an organization (hint: you're now a professional in an organization) and if you’ve enjoyed this post at all, you’ll love this book. You may think that this book applies to ‘managers’ and ‘business’ and not medicine but you couldn’t be more wrong. Although it was probably written around the time you were born, nearly everything in this book is a lesson that directly applies to your professional life in medicine and when you start seeing it, you’ll feel like you’re in The Matrix.
Congratulations! You've worked hard to get here. Be proud of yourself, your degree, your long white coat and be the best doctor you can be.
submitted by kiteandkey to Residency [link] [comments]

5 Bitcoin Entrepreneurs from around the world share their Startup Stories...

Albeit a new technology, Bitcoin has made quite a mark in the global economy with more entrepreneurs opening up to this new form of digital currency.
5 Bitcoin entrepreneurs from around the world share their stories of running a startup in the Bitcoin space.
#1 Kiyotake Kobayashi, [Baskadia]: Kiyotake is the CEO of Baskadia, a website that allows users to upload art and be tipped in Bitcoin. It is great that artists can now be recognized for their work, and earn Bitcoin while they are at it!
"The most rewarding thing is that Bitcoin is the most popular “border-less” currency, which makes it easy to do global business" - Kiyotake

#2 Robin Singh, [Koinly]: Robin's company Koinly is a service that helps Bitcoin owners figure out the taxes they owe. Pretty useful for making sure you don’t have the government come knocking at your door!
"The day your grandma can buy Bitcoins without going through you is the day Bitcoin has finally matured" - Robin

#3 Roman Vassilenko, [Desentra]: Desentra is a website that offers courses in learning what Bitcoin is all about. Perfect for new users and old, who want to discover more about the world of Bitcoin.
" One of the best pieces of advice, before you start using Bitcoin, is to educate yourself about how to safely buy and store cryptocurrency such as Bitcoin " - Roman

#4 Pankaj Balani, [Delta Exchange]: Delta Exchanges is one of the best derivative exchanges in India. A great way to earn some money playing the market!
"One of the best things about Bitcoin is the strong and dedicated community that is associated with it" - Pankaj

#5 Gaurav Agrawal, [CoinMonks]: CoinMonks is a really useful blog and resource for all things Bitcoin!
"I believe more people (Under 30) will invest and hold Bitcoin" - Gaurav

Source: 5 Bitcoin Startup CEOs share their Stories
submitted by primalfabric to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

My stock study watchlist. would appreciate criticisms or red flags

Core
- FB ecosystem
This is the stock that i believe is invested in the right places and has a path forward in the global market. I work as a React developer in fintech and I greatly enjoy their technology. The reason I stopped using snapchat was because I couldn't use it on low connection in Mexico, but Instagram worked marvelously. I use Whatsapp to stay in touch with my family in mexico and Facebook to stay in touch with my mom. There's something extremely powerful about that in my opinion.
They're conservative with their push and development of camera and VR technology which is wise in my opinion give the many opportunities that exist in that space. They're pushing along with fintech in India, again with small business through Whatsapp. And they provide a suite of customer services for small business and entrepeneurs.

- Microsoft
I think they will have a great run during the cloud era of software development. Their acquiring of Github AND NPM goes to show how in touch they are with developer servicing.

- Paypal
Paypal has a marvelous history and is a battle tested pioneer in the fintech space. I see them repeating their previous successes by acquiring Honey. I work with Honey in the fintech space and now I'm understanding that Paypal has an auto coupon scraper on my Amazon purchases while my Visa ones don't. This is the forward thinking I love from Paypal despite not being as flashy as Square.

- Disney
Disney is quintessential american entertainment. I believe their deep roots in American culture and the entertainment industry will provide a solid bedrock for them for the generations to come.

- Waste Management
Sanitation and environmental, like internet connection technology, are about the same when it comes to market penetration. It is a scarcity. Sanitation is a critical part of any society's development and wellbeing. I think WM will be there to benefit from increased urbanization and industriousness from technology and wealth growth.

- Kansas City Southern
I'm Mexican and my family are avocado farmers. I believe in the future prospects of Mexico and its relationship with its neighbors. Mexico is a bustling nation and many youth are international students that carry degrees. This is a far cry from having military policing streets in rural neighborhoods decades ago. Kansas city southern is part of the supply chain that connects Mexico to main industrious Mexican states like Monterrey, Jalisco, and Michaocan. I like rail in this regard because it's a lot of weight in one operation of heavy materials. So Canadians that use Mexican mining will also benefit from this railroad.
- Nintendo
I believe in the future of gaming as a market and if I were to take a shot at who would be the most stable, I would vote for Nintendo. Like Facebook, they approach the family unit and grow generationally. I love their curveball approach to gaming and I think that creativity, along with it's customers trust, will be something I can hold onto for a long time versus companies that have a history of developing games like Call of Duty or World of Warcraft. Nintendo can take different forms: in the living room, at sweaty tournaments, online, mobile, on your phone, on a TV, in the movies, etc.

Closely watching
- United Health or Cigna
This is only going to grow and wont change due to American politics for 8 years at a minimum.
- Cisco
Same as Microsoft but for IT.
- Impossible Foods IPO
I've been vegetarian for 10 years and Impossible Burgers has been one of the most mindblowing experiences of my life. The product is phenomenal and on a league of its owned compared to Beyond Meat. IMHO Beyond taste like cheap school lunchroom burgers and Impossible tastes like something I would be excited to feed my family. If their pork products are great then I am ALL in because Chicken products are by far the easiest thing to replicate. I'm extremely excited about this product.
- Visa
They make a ton of money on transactions. I saw them hiring for blockchain development so it leads me to believe that they're adapting.
- Square
I work in the fintech space and I like their modest approach to financial services. Their acquiring of a bank charter is actually incredibly important due to all the procurement and legal processes that go behind being a fintech company (abiding by federal security laws, etc). The one reason I like Chase banking is because I enjoy their app. I see Square as a competitor to Chase, surprisingly.
- Apple
Apple designs its products with customer service in mind. I think the future of education technology will likely go to Apple because of this. Their screens and cameras are wonderful and I can see them pioneering computer vision products because of this. They are THE American Tech company.
- TMobile
Aggressive as hell and grew to be a large player through savvy moves across time. Their customer service is a highlight for me.
- JPM
Customer service for banking is unmatched IMO. If any legacy banker will make it across changes, I believe Chase is doing what it takes to adapt and think forward.
- Planet Fitness
$10 gyms, clean, and casual enough for the general population. You can't beat $10 gym membership when you're broke as fuck. I've been a heavy lifter before and still used Planet fitness in my transitions across states and whatnot. I need to look at their numbers more closely.
- Volkwagen
I trust Europe and Japan to take EVs more seriously. I don't know who will seriously come close to competing with Tesla in the long run but they'll have to.
- Panasonic
Panasonic, much like AMD, did not immediately reflect the value of what they have produced. AMD did not explode inline with bitcoin or cheaper GPU consumption, in the same way Panasonic did not reflect a massive spike in price after speculation in Tesla grew. They're an important arm to the EV market that spreads across many players ranging from Tesla to Toyota to big tech.

- Lyft
I think Lyft's focus on customer service and regional clientele will pay off against Uber, who is growing too quickly and spreading thin. Lyft will benefit from the development of computer vision and Big tech's interest in automanufacturing.

- Crypto (Bitcoin or XRP)
I like crypto as a technology as a software engineer. I see the value in a faster process for procuring and exchanging legal tender that does not have to go through the bottleneck of the ACH process or through legal issues like the PATRIOT ACT or the Bank Secrecy Act. It still fundamentally respects those laws without the frustrations of banking service bottlenecks. I think the halvening protocol has an interesting affect on Bitcoin and supply and the market that it's trying to generate.







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submitted by codingprofessor to investing [link] [comments]

Mega eTextbooks release thread (part-28)! Find your textbooks here between $5-$25 :)

Please find the list below:
  1. Disease Gene Identification: Methods and Protocols, 2nd Edition: Johanna K. DiStefano
  2. Statistical Aspects of the Microbiological Examination of Foods, 3rd Edition: Basil Jarvis
  3. Revel for Social Problems, 14th Edition: Stanley Eitzen & Maxine Baca Zinn & Kelly Ei Smith
  4. Fundamentals of Human Resource Management: Pearson New International Edition, 3rd Edition: Gary Dessler
  5. Economics Today: The Micro View, 18th Edition: Roger LeRoy Miller
  6. Employment Law for Business, 8th Edition: Dawn Bennett-Alexander & Laura Hartman
  7. Surgical Exposures in Orthopaedics: The Anatomic Approach, 5th Edition: Stanley Hoppenfeld & Piet de Boer & Richard Buckley
  8. Project Management in Construction, 7th Edition: Sidney Levy
  9. Financial and Managerial Accounting, 7th Edition: John Wild & Ken Shaw & Barbara Chiappetta
  10. Handbook of Plant Disease Identification and Management, 1st Edition: Balaji Aglave
  11. Ubuntu Unleashed 2019 Edition: Covering 18.04, 18.10, 19.04, 13th Edition: Matthew Helmke
  12. Handbook of Insulin Therapies, 1st Edition: Winston Crasto & Janet Jarvis & Melanie J. Davies
  13. Python for Programmers: with Big Data and Artificial Intelligence Case Studies, 1st Edition: Paul J. Deitel & Harvey Deitel
  14. Medical Ethics: Accounts of Ground-Breaking Cases, 7th Edition: Gregory Pence
  15. Human Resource Management, 13th Edition: Gary Dessler
  16. The Biology and Therapeutic Application of Mesenchymal Cells, 2 Volume Set, 1st Edition: Kerry Atkinson
  17. Computer Security Fundamentals, 3rd Edition: William Chuck Easttom
  18. Hendee's Radiation Therapy Physics, 4th Edition: Todd Pawlicki & Daniel J. Scanderbeg & George Starkschall
  19. Nutrient Delivery, 1st Edition: Alexandru Grumezescu
  20. Technology Entrepreneurship: Taking Innovation to the Marketplace, 2nd Edition: Thomas N. Duening & Robert A. Hisrich & Michael A. Lechter
  21. Chemistry of Metalloproteins: Problems and Solutions in Bioinorganic Chemistry, 1st Edition: Joseph J. Stephanos & Anthony W. Addison
  22. Mathematical Statistics with Applications in R, 2nd Edition: Kandethody M. Ramachandran & Chris P. Tsokos
  23. Diagnostic Imaging: Genitourinary, 3rd Edition: Mitchell E. Tublin
  24. Comprehensive Management of Arteriovenous Malformations of the Brain and Spine, 1st Edition: Robert F. Spetzler & Douglas S. Kondziolka & Randall T. Higashida & M. Yashar S. Kalani
  25. Digital Design: With an Introduction to the Verilog HDL, 5th Edition: M. Morris R. Mano & Michael D. Ciletti
  26. Plasmids: Biology and Impact in Biotechnology and Discovery, 1st Edition: Marcelo E. Tolmasky & Juan C. Alonso
  27. Consumer Behavior: Buying, Having, and Being, Global Edition, 12th Edition: Michael R. Solomon
  28. Project Management Case Studies, 5th Edition: Harold Kerzner
  29. Medical Phisiology: Principles for Clinical Medicine, 4th Edition: Rodney A. Rhoades & David R. Bell
  30. Essentials of Contemporary Management, 7th Edition: Gareth Jones & Jennifer George
  31. Harmony and Voice Leading, 4th Edition: Thomas E. Benjamin & Michael Horvit & Robert S. Nelson
  32. Principles of Economics, 2nd Edition: Lee Coppock & Dirk Mateer
  33. Oral Microbiology and Immunology, 2nd Edition: Richard J. Lamont & George N. Hajishengallis & Howard F. Jenkinson
  34. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain and Spine, 5th Edition: Scott W. Atlas
  35. Accounting Information Systems: Controls and Processes, 3rd Edition: Leslie Turner & Andrea B. Weickgenannt & Mary Kay Copeland
  36. Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility: Sustainable Value Creation, 5th Edition: David Chandler
  37. Julien's Primer of Drug Action: A Comprehensive Guide to the Actions, Uses, and Side Effects of Psychoactive Drugs, 14th Edition: Claire D. Advokat & Joseph Comaty & Robert Julien
  38. The Grand Chessboard: American Primacy And Its Geostrategic Imperatives, 1st Edition: Zbigniew Brzezinski
  39. The Cosmic Perspective: The Solar System, 8th Edition: Jeffrey O. Bennett & Megan O. Donahue & Nicholas Schneider & Mark Voit
  40. Ultrastructure Atlas of Human Tissues, 1st Edition: Fred Hossler
  41. Advances in the Biology and Management of Modern Bed Bugs, 1st Edition: Stephen L. Doggett & Dini M. Miller & Chow-Yang Lee
  42. Patterns of World History: Volume One: To 1600, 1st Edition: Peter von Sivers & Charles A. Desnoyers & George B. Stow
  43. Genitourinary Imaging: A Core Review, 1st Edition: Matthew Davenport
  44. Evidence-based Obstetrics and Gynecology, 1st Edition: Errol R. Norwitz & Carolyn M. Zelop & David A. Miller & David L. Keefe
  45. Zoology, 10th Edition: Stephen Miller & John Harley
  46. Radical and Reconstructive Gynecologic Cancer Surgery, 1st Edition: Robert Bristow & Dennis Chi
  47. Davis's Diseases & Disorders A Nursing Therapeutics Manual, 6th Edition: Marilyn Sawyer Sommers
  48. Management & Cost Accounting, 6th Edition: Alnoor Bhimani
  49. Elements of Modern Algebra, 8th Edition: Linda Gilbert
  50. Psychiatric & Mental Health Nursing, 4th Edition: Katie Evans & Debra Nizette & Anthony O'Brien
  51. Molecular Biology: Different Facets, 1st Edition: Anjali Priyadarshini & Prerna Pandey
  52. Elementary Number Theory, 7th Edition: David Burton
  53. Accounting Information Systems, 14th Edition: Marshall B. Romney & Paul J. Steinbart
  54. Microeconomics, Global Edition, 9th Edition: Robert Pindyck & Daniel Rubinfeld
  55. Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing Demystified, 1st Edition: Jim Keogh
  56. Entrepreneurship, 10th Edition: Robert Hisrich & Michael Peters & Dean Shepherd
  57. Ganong's Review of Medical Physiology, 26th Edition: Kim E. Barrett & Susan M. Barman & Jason Yuan & Heddwen L. Brooks
  58. Textbook of Obstetrics and Gynaecology: A life course approach, 1st Edition: Eric A.P. Steegers & Bart C.J.M. Fauser & Carina G.J.M. Hilders
  59. Engineering Mechanics: Statics, 8th Edition: James L. Meriam & L. G. Kraige & J. N. Bolton
  60. Basic Concepts of Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing, 8th Edition: Louise Rebraca Shives
  61. Beckmann and Ling's Obstetrics and Gynecology, 8th Edition: Robert Casanova
  62. Biology: Concepts and Applications, 10th Edition: Cecie Starr & Christine Evers & Lisa Starr
  63. Estimating in Building Construction, 9th Edition: Steven J. Peterson & Frank R. Dagostino
  64. The Big Back Book: Tips & Tricks for Therapists, 1st Edition: Jane Johnson
  65. University Physics with Modern Physics, 14th Edition: Hugh D. Young & Roger A. Freedman
  66. Poisoning and Drug Overdose, 7th Edition: Kent Olson & Ilene Anderson & Neal Benowitz & Paul Blanc
  67. Koneman's Color Atlas and Textbook of Diagnostic Microbiology, 7th Edition: Gary W. Procop
  68. Experimental Psychology, 7th Edition: Anne Myers & Christine H. Hansen
  69. Marketing: An Introduction, 13th Edition: Gary Armstrong & Philip Kotler
  70. Gray's Anatomy for Students: With Student Consult, 3rd Edition: Richard Drake & A. Wayne Vogl & Adam W. M. Mitchell
  71. Chestnut's Obstetric Anesthesia: Principles and Practice, 5th Edition: David H. Chestnut & Cynthia A Wong & Lawrence C Tsen & Warwick D Ngan Kee & Yaakov Beilin & Jill Mhyre
  72. Chemistry: The Molecular Science, 5th Edition: John W. Moore & Conrad L. Stanitski
  73. Head, Neck and Dental Emergencies, 2nd Edition: Mike Perry
  74. Wong's Nursing Care of Infants and Children, 10th Edition: Marilyn J. Hockenberry & David Wilson
  75. Sports Emergency Care: A Team Approach, 3rd Edition: Robb Rehberg & Jeff G. Konin
  76. New Venture Creation: Entrepreneurship for the 21st Century, 10th Edition: Stephen Spinelli & Rob Adams
  77. Caring for the Vulnerable: Perspectives in Nursing Theory, Practice, and Research, 5th Edition: Mary de Chesnay & Barbara Anderson
  78. Geometry: The Line and the Circle: Maureen T. Carroll & Elyn Rykken
  79. Histories of Human Engineering: Tact and Technology: Maarten Derksen
  80. Land Restoration: Reclaiming Landscapes for a Sustainable Future, 1st Edition: Ilan Chabay & Martin Frick & Jennifer Helgeson
  81. Yamada's Handbook of Gastroenterology, 3rd Edition: Tadataka Yamada & John M. Inadomi & Renuka Bhattacharya & Jason A. Dominitz & Joo Ha Hwang
  82. Theoretical Physics 9: Fundamentals of Many-body Physics, 2nd Edition: Wolfgang Nolting & William D. Brewer
  83. Introduction to Programming with C++, 3rd Edition: Y. Daniel Liang
  84. Dental Emergencies, 1st Edition: Mark Greenwood & Ian Corbett
  85. Fundamentals of Physics and Chemistry of the Atmosphere, 2nd Edition: Guido Visconti
  86. Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 3rd Edition: William L. Briggs & Lyle Cochran & Bernard Gillett & Eric Schulz
  87. Educating Physical Therapists, 1st Edition: Gail Jensen
  88. Strategic Developments in Eurasia After 11 September, 1st Edition: Shireen Hunter
  89. Contemporary Issues in Healthcare Law and Ethics, 4th Edition: Dean Harris
  90. Transitioning from RN to MSN: Principles of Professional Role Development: Brenda Scott & Mindy Thompson
  91. Principles and Practice of Public Health Surveillance, 3rd Edition: Lisa M. Lee & Steven M. Teutsch & Stephen B. Thacker & Michael E. St. Louis
  92. Elementary Statistics: Picturing the World, 6th Edition: Ron Larson & Betsy Farber
  93. Human Sexuality in a World of Diversity, 6th Canadian Edition: Spencer A. Rathus & Jeffrey S. Nevid & Lois Fichner-Rathus & Alex McKay & Robin Milhausen
  94. Becoming Your Own Banker, 6th Edition: R. Nelson Nash
  95. Murach's MySQL, 3rd Edition: Joel Murach
  96. Intermediate Algebra, 13th Edition: Marvin L. Bittinger & Judith A. Beecher & Barbara L. Johnson
  97. Planning Health Promotion Programs: An Intervention Mapping Approach, 4th Edition: L. Kay Bartholomew Eldredge & Christine M. Markham & Robert A. C. Ruiter & Maria E. Fernández & Gerjo Kok & Guy S. Parcel
  98. Human Factors in Simple and Complex Systems, 3rd Edition: Robert W. Proctor & Trisha Van Zandt
  99. The Irony of Democracy: An Uncommon Introduction to American Politics, 17th Edition: Louis Schubert & Thomas R. Dye & Harmon Zeigler
  100. Understanding Earth, 7th Edition: John Grotzinger
  101. Nursing Research in Canada: Methods, Critical Appraisal, and Utilization, 4th Edition: Geri LoBiondo-Wood & Judith Haber & Cherylyn Cameron & Mina Singh
  102. The Philosophy of Film, 1st Edition: Thomas E. Wartenberg & Angela Curran
  103. Disaster Nursing and Emergency Preparedness, 4th Edition: Tener Goodwin Veenema
  104. Language in Mind: An Introduction to Psycholinguistics, 2nd Edition: Julie Sedivy
  105. Medical Anthropology: A Biocultural Approach, 3rd Edition: Andrea S. Wiley & John S. Allen
  106. Exploring Biology in the Laboratory, 3rd Edition: Murray P. Pendarvis & John L. Crawley
  107. Guide to Networking Essentials, 8th Edition: Greg Tomsho
  108. Social Psychology: A Storytelling Approach, 2nd Edition: Leonard Newman & Ralph Erber
  109. Managing Conflict: An Introspective Journey to Negotiating Skills, 1st Edition: Dorothy Balancio
  110. Environmental Change and Challenge: A Canadian Perspective, 5th Edition: Philip Dearden & Bruce Mitchell
  111. Brain and Behavior: A Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective, 1st Edition: David Eagleman & Jonathan Downar
  112. Cardiac/Vascular Nurse Exam Secrets Study Guide: Cardiac/Vascular Nurse Test Review for the Cardiac/Vascular Nurse Exam: Mometrix Media & Cardiac Vascular Nurse Exam Secrets
  113. Keeping the Republic: Power and Citizenship in American Politics, The Essentials, 9th Edition: Christine Barbour & Gerald Wright
  114. Principles of Environmental Science, 9th Edition: William Cunningham & Mary Cunningham
  115. Thomas' Calculus, 14th Edition: Joel R. Hass & Christopher E. Heil & Maurice D. Weir
  116. Pharmacology for Canadian Pharmacy Technicians, 1st Edition: Leland Norman Holland & Michael P. Adams & Jeanine Lynn Brice & Heather V. LeBlanc
  117. Cellular and Molecular Immunology, 9th Edition: Abul K. Abbas & Andrew H. Lichtman & Shiv Pillai
  118. Operations Management: Processes and Supply Chains, 11th Edition: Lee J. Krajewski & Manoj K. Malhotra & Larry P. Ritzman
  119. Jews, Christians, Muslims: A Comparative Introduction to Monotheistic Religions, 2nd Edition: John Corrigan & Frederick Denny & Martin S Jaffee & Carlos Eire
  120. Professional Nursing: Concepts & Challenges, 9th Edition: Beth Black
  121. Practical Homicide Investigation: Tactics, Procedures, and Forensic Techniques, 4th Edition: Vernon J. Geberth
  122. Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing: Materials, Processes and Systems, 7th Edition: Mikell P. Groover
  123. Genetics: A Conceptual Approach, 7th Edition: Benjamin A. Pierce
  124. Computer Science Illuminated, 7th Edition: Nell Dale & John Lewis
  125. The Globalization of World Politics: An Introduction to International Relations, 8th Edition: John Baylis & Steve Smith & Patricia Owens
  126. Behavioral Neuroscience, 9th Edition: S. Marc Breedlove & Neil V. Watson
  127. Canadian Human Resource Management: A Strategic Approach, 12th Edition: Hermann Schwind & Krista Uggerslev & Terry Wagar & Neil Fassina
  128. Brief Principles of Macroeconomics, 9th Edition: N. Gregory Mankiw
  129. Living in the Environment, 4th Canadian Edition: G. Miller & Dave Hackett & Carl Wolfe
  130. Principles of Economics, 9th Edition: N. Gregory Mankiw
  131. Principles of Microeconomics, 9th Edition: N. Gregory Mankiw
  132. Child Development, 9th Edition: Laura E. Berk
  133. Home, School, and Community Collaboration: Culturally Responsive Family Engagement, 4th Edition: Kathy Beth Grant & Julie A. Ray
  134. Set Lighting Technician's Handbook, 4th Edition: Harry Box
  135. Clinical Nurse Leader Certification Review, 2nd Edition: Cynthia R. King
  136. Basic Chemistry, 4th Edition: Karen C. Timberlake & William Timberlake
  137. Sparks & Taylor's Nursing Diagnosis Pocket Guide, 3rd Edition: Linda Phelps
  138. Family Theories: Foundations and Applications, 1st Edition: Katherine R. Allen & Angela C. Henderson
  139. The Earth and Its Peoples: A Global History, 7th Edition: Richard Bulliet & Pamela Crossley & Daniel Headrick & Steven Hirsch & Lyman Johnson
  140. Sociology in Action: A Canadian Perspective, 3rd Edition: Tami Bereska & Diane Symbaluk
  141. Operations Management: Processes and Supply Chains, 12th Edition: Lee J. Krajewski & Manoj K. Malhotra & Larry P. Ritzman
  142. Introduction to Food Science and Food Systems, 2nd Edition: Rick Parker & Miriah Pace
  143. Liaisons, Student Edition: An Introduction to French, 3rd Edition: Wynne Wong & Stacey Weber-Fève & Bill VanPatten
  144. Zuckerman Parker Handbook of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics for Primary Care, 4th Edition: Marilyn Augustyn & Barry Zuckerman
  145. Teaching in Today's Inclusive Classrooms: A Universal Design for Learning Approach, 3rd Edition: Richard M. Gargiulo & Debbie Metcalf
  146. The Biological Basis of Mental Health, 3rd Edition: William T. Blows
  147. Developing and Managing Electronic Collections: The Essentials: Peggy Johnson
  148. Western Civilization: Volume II: Since 1500, 10th Edition: Jackson J. Spielvogel
  149. Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know about the People We Don't Know, 1st Edition: Malcolm Gladwell
  150. Understanding Pathophysiology, 7th Edition: Sue E. Huether & Kathryn L. McCance
  151. Our Environment: A Canadian Perspective, 5th edition: Dianne Draper & Ann Zimmerman
  152. Criminal Law: Cases and Materials, 8th Edition: John Kaplan & Robert Weisberg & Guyora Binder
  153. A Photographic Atlas of Histology, 2nd Edition: Michael J Leboffe
  154. Dragons and Tigers: A Geography of South, East, and Southeast Asia, 3rd Edition: Barbara A. Weightman
  155. Climate Change Biology, 1st Edition: Jonathan A. Newman & Madhur Anand & Hugh A. L. Henry & Shelley L. Hunt & Ze'ev Gedalof
  156. The Power of Critical Thinking: 5th Canadian Edition: Chris MacDonald and Lewis Vaughn
  157. Principles of Fire Behavior and Combustion, 4th Edition: Richard Gann & Raymond Friedman
  158. Informatics Nurse Exam Secrets Study Guide: Informatics Test Review for the Informatics Nurse Certification Exam: Informatics Exam Secrets Test Prep Team
  159. General Chemistry, 10th Edition: Darrell Ebbing & Steven D. Gammon
  160. A Practical Guide to Computer Forensics Investigations, 1st Edition: Darren R. Hayes
  161. Basic Biomechanics, 8th Edition: Susan Hall
  162. Essay Writing for Canadian Students, 8th Edition: Roger Davis & Laura K. Davis
  163. Biology, 11th Edition: Peter Raven & George Johnson & Kenneth Mason & Jonathan Losos & Susan Singer
  164. Molecular Imaging, 1st Edition: Ralph Weissleder& Brian D. Ross & Alnawaz Rehemtulla & Sanjiv Sam Gambhir
  165. Criminology, 4th Edition: Frank Schmalleger
  166. A Theory of Truthmaking: Metaphysics, Ontology, and Reality: Jamin Asay
  167. The Routledge Handbook of Metaphysical Grounding, 1st Edition: Michael J. Raven
  168. Linear Algebra and Its Applications, 5th Edition: David C. Lay & Steven R. Lay & Judi J. McDonald
  169. Essentials of Human Communication, 9th Edition: Joseph A. DeVito
  170. Economics: Principles, Applications, and Tools, 9th Edition, Global Edition: Arthur O'Sullivan & Steven Sheffrin & Stephen Perez
  171. Global Health 101, 3rd Edition: Richard Skolnik
  172. Mathematical Proofs: A Transition to Advanced Mathematics, 4th Edition: Gary Chartrand & Albert D. Polimeni & Ping Zhang
  173. Concepts in Strategic Management and Business Policy: Globalization, Innovation and Sustainability, 15th Edition, Global Edition: Thomas L. Wheelen & J. David Hunger & Alan N. Hoffman & Charles E. Bamford
  174. Chemistry: The Central Science, 14th Edition, Global Edition: Theodore E. Brown & H. Eugene LeMay & Bruce E. Bursten & Catherine Murphy & Patrick Woodward & Matthew E. Stoltzfus
  175. Biopsychology, 10th Edition, Global Edition: John P. J. Pinel & Steven Barnes
  176. Electric Circuits, 11th Edition: James W. Nilsson & Susan Riedel
  177. Keeping the Republic; Power and Citizenship in American Politics, the Essentials, 8th Edition: Christine Barbour & Gerald C Wright
  178. Applied Behavior Analysis: Pearson New International Edition, 2nd Edition: John O. Cooper & Timothy E. Heron & William L. Heward
  179. Cryptography and Network Security: Principles and Practice, 7th Edition, Global Edition: William Stallings
  180. Operating Systems: Internals and Design Principles, 9th Edition, Global Edition: William Stallings
  181. Options, Futures, and Other Derivatives, 9th Edition, Global Edition: John C. Hull
  182. Invitation to the Psychology of Religion, 3rd Edition: Raymond F. Paloutzian
  183. Valuation: The Art and Science of Corporate Investment Decisions, 3rd Edition: Sheridan Titman
  184. Comprehensive Clinical Nephrology, 5th Edition: Richard J. Johnson & John Feehally & Jurgen Floege
  185. Miller & Freund's Probability and Statistics for Engineers, 9th Edition, Global Edition: Richard Johnson & Irwin Miller & John Freund
  186. Exploring Strategy: Text and Cases, 11th Edition: Gerry Johnson & Richard Whittington & Patrick Regnér & Kevan Scholes & Duncan Angwin
  187. Economics for Business, 7th Edition: John Sloman
  188. Essentials of Economics, 7th Edition: John Sloman & Dean Garratt
  189. Economics, 9th Edition: John Sloman & Dean Garratt & Alison Wride
  190. Essential Economics for Business, 5th Edition: Johnsloman & Jones Elizabeth
  191. Finite Mathematics, 7th Edition: Stefan Waner & Steven Costenoble
  192. The SAGE Encyclopedia of Surveillance, Security, and Privacy, 1st Edition: Bruce A. Arrigo
  193. Evolution, 4th Edition: Douglas J. Futuyma & Mark Kirkpatrick
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  219. Bates' Pocket Guide to Physical Examination and History Taking, 8th Edition: Lynn S. Bickley
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  223. Human Biology: Concepts and Current Issues, 8th Edition, Global Edition: Michael D. Johnson
  224. Messages: Building Interpersonal Communication Skills, 5th Canadian Edition: Joseph A. DeVito & Rena Shimoni & Dawne Clark
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  226. Computational Systems Pharmacology and Toxicology, 1st Edition: Rudy J Richardson & Dale E Johnson & Noffisat Oki & David Faulkner
  227. Shelly Cashman Series Microsoft Office 365 & Office 2019 Introductory, 1st Edition: Sandra Cable & Steven M. Freund & Ellen Monk & Susan L. Sebok & Joy L. Starks
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  230. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy with Couples and Families: A Comprehensive Guide for Clinicians, 1st Edition: Frank M. Dattilio & Aaron T. Beck
  231. International Marketing, 17th Edition: Philip R. Cateora & John Graham & Mary C Gilly
  232. Kaplan and Sadock's Concise Textbook of Clinical Psychiatry, 3rd Edition: Benjamin Sadock & Virginia Alcott Sadock
  233. Anthropology, 14th Edition: Carol R. Ember & Melvin Ember & Peter N. Peregrine
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  236. ICD-10-CM 2019: The Complete Official Codebook, 1st Edition: American Medical Association
  237. Essentials of Human Anatomy & Physiology, 12th Edition, Global Edition: Elaine N. Marieb & Suzanne M. Keller
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  239. Programming Bitcoin: Learn How to Program Bitcoin from Scratch, 1st Edition: Jimmy Song
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  243. Introduction to Econometrics, Updated 3rd Edition, Global Edition: James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson
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  245. Expert Oracle Application Express, 2nd Edition: Doug Gault & Dimitri Gielis & Martin DSouza & Roel Hartman
  246. The Art of Reasoning: An Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking, 4th Edition: David Kelley
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  249. Applied Strength of Materials, SI Units Version, 6th Edition: Robert L. Mott & Joseph A. Untener
  250. Social Psychology, 12th Edition: David Myers & Jean Twenge
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  270. Corporate Finance: Theory and Practice, 5th Edition: Pierre Vernimmen & Pascal Quiry & Maurizio Dallocchio & Yann Le Fur & Antonio Salvi
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  273. Business Essentials, 8th Canadian Edition: Ronald J. Ebert & Ricky W. Griffin & Frederick A. Starke & George Dracopoulos
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  275. The Routledge Companion to Business Ethics, 1st Edition: Eugene Heath & Byron Kaldis & Alexei Marcoux
  276. Geosystems An Introduction to Physical Geography, Global Edition, 9th Edition: Ginger H. Birkel & Robert W. Christopherson
  277. Scientific American Environmental Science for a Changing World, 2nd Edition: Jeneen InterlandI & Anne Houtman
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  280. Introduction to Materials Science for Engineers, 8th Edition: James F. Shackelford
  281. Adobe Dreamweaver CC Classroom in a Book, 1st Edition: Jim Maivald
  282. Trigonometry, 11th Edition: Margaret L. Lial & John Hornsby & David I. Schneider & Callie Daniels
  283. Investment Banks, Hedge Funds, and Private Equity, 3rd Edition: David P. Stowell
  284. Cognitive Neuroscience: The Biology of the Mind, 5th Edition: Michael Gazzaniga & Richard B. Ivry & George R. Mangun
  285. Cognitive Neuroscience: The Biology of the Mind, 5th Edition: Michael Gazzaniga & Richard B. Ivry (Author), George R. Mangun (Author)
  286. Project Management Theory and Practice, 3rd Edition: Gary L. Richardson & Brad M. Jackson
  287. Organic Chemistry: Structure and Function, 8th Edition: K. Peter C. Vollhardt & Neil E. Schore
  288. Read, Reason, Write: An Argument Text and Read, 11th Edition: Dorothy Seyler
  289. Fundamentals of Management: Management Myths Debunked!, Global Edition, 10th Edition: Stephen P Robbins & David A. De Cenzo & Mary Coulter
  290. Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach, Global Edition, 7th Edition: James Kurose & Keith Ross
  291. An Introduction to Banking: Principles, Strategy and Risk Management, 2nd Edition: Moorad Choudhry
  292. The Immune System, 4th Edition: Peter Parham
  293. Biochemistry: Concepts and Connections, Global Edition, 1st Edition: Dean R. Appling & Spencer J. Anthony-Cahill & Christopher K. Mathews
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  311. Contemporary Logistics, 12th Edition, Global Edition: Paul R. Murphy & A. Michael Knemeyer
  312. Mechanical Engineers' Handbook, Volume 1: Materials and Engineering Mechanics, 4th Edition: Myer Kutz
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  332. Global Business Ethics: Responsible Decision Making in an International Context, 1st Edition: Ronald D Francis & Guy Murfey
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  354. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice: 2-Volume Set, 9th Edition: Ron Walls & Robert Hockberger & Marianne Gausche-Hill
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